Rohingya people

The world shuts its doors

A Rohingya refugee in Bangladesh. Photo: Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

The world hasn’t seen such staggering numbers of people fleeing violence, persecution and desperation since World War II — and countries that had offered safe harbor are beginning to turn them away.

Driving the news: The U.S. has declined to offer Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Bahamians in the wake of Hurricane Dorian, a particularly stark manifestation of the Trump administration’s efforts to close America’s borders to nearly all refugees and asylum-seekers.

128,000 Rohingya Muslims remain displaced in Myanmar

Refugee camp
Photo: Dibyanshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images

Myanmar's government has said it will close refugee camps housing 128,000 displaced Rohingya Muslims in an effort to to spur development, but a Reuters investigation has revealed the act will do little to restore freedom of movement — meaning the situation in Rakhine state will remain largely the same for a group UN investigators suspect has been targeted for ethnic cleansing.

The big picture: While the government of Aung San Suu Kyi builds more permanent homes next to the camps, Rohingya refugees will be unable to return to the areas from which they were displaced. They remain to subject to official checkpoints and threats of violence, essentially causing them to be cut from "sources of livelihood" and dependent on humanitarian aid, according to Reuters.

Go deeper: Rohingya refugees long to return home but fear what they'd find there