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Russian phishing sites targeted conservatives, Senate

Microsoft's Russian headquarters office building at night
Microsoft's Russian headquarters, as seen at night. Photo: Mikhail Tereshchenko/TASS via Getty Images

Microsoft last week seized six potential phishing domains associated with the Kremlin-backed hackers Fancy Bear, who tampered with the 2016 election and likely intended to target two conservative groups and the U.S. Senate. It appears Microsoft shut down the domains before they were ever actively used.

Why it matters: Spies have infiltrated legislative bodies and political groups from time immemorial, usually for boring reasons, like getting an edge in trade negotiations. But Russia's mass public dumping of stolen documents in 2016 broke the norms of espionage. Whatever the motivation for Russian attempts to hack influential political figures' emails in 2018, the current climate will lead people to assume the worst.

Google, Apple ditch college degree requirements

Google pop-up shop in the SoHo, New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Google pop-up shop in the SoHo, New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

More than a dozen companies, including Google, Apple and IBM, are no longer requiring applicants to have college degrees, CNBC reports.

Why it matters: Many jobs have historically required employees to hold college degrees even if they are not relevant or needed. This is connected to an effort to improve diversity and make it easier for those that attend coding boot camps or pursue other non-traditional college paths to be hired.