Axios

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 5,432,512 — Total deaths: 345,375 — Total recoveries — 2,182,202Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 1,643,499 — Total deaths: 97,722 — Total recoveries: 366,736 — Total tested: 14,163,915Map.
  3. 2020: Trump threatens to move Republican convention from North Carolina.
  4. World: White House announces travel restrictions on Brazil Over 100 cases in Germany tied to single day of church services.
  5. Public health: Officials are urging Americans to wear masks over Memorial Day.
  6. Economy: White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett says it's possible the unemployment rate could still be in double digits by November's election.
  7. What should I do? Hydroxychloroquine questions answeredTraveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump threatens to move Republican convention from North Carolina if capacity reduced

President Trump on stage during the 2016 Republican National Convention in Ohio. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

President Trump threatened in a series of Monday tweets to move this summer's Republican National Convention from Charlotte if North Carolina's Democratic governor, Roy Cooper, doesn't allow the event to be held at full capacity.

The state of play: Mandy Cohen, the state's health and human services secretary, said last week that the GOP should "plan for the worst" as mass gatherings will be a "very big challenge" if the number of coronavirus cases in the state continues to increase, per NPR.

U.S. coronavirus updates

The CDC is warning of potentially "aggressive rodent behavior" amid a rise in reports of rat activity in several areas, as the animals search further for food while Americans stay home more during the coronavirus pandemic.

By the numbers: More than 97,700 people have died from COVID-19 and over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Over 366,700 Americans have recovered and more than 14.1 million tests have been conducted.

World coronavirus updates

Japan's economy minister outlined plans on Monday to end the nationwide state of emergency as the number of new novel coronavirus cases continues to decline to fewer than 50 a day, per Bloomberg. Japan has reported 16,550 cases and 820 deaths.

By the numbers: Over 5.4 million people have tested positive for the virus as of Monday, and more than 2.1 million have recovered. The U.S. has reported the most cases in the world (over 1.6 million from 13.7 million tests). The U.K. is reporting over 36,800 deaths from the coronavirus — the most fatalities outside the U.S.

In photos: Authorities issue warning as Americans venture out for Memorial Day weekend

Venice Beach in Los Angeles on May 24. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images

Authorities urged Americans to maintain social distancing and wear masks to protect against the spread of the novel coronavirus amid reports of packed beaches and bars during the Memorial Day weekend.

Driving the news: Law enforcement stepped up beach patrols, authorities on Florida's Gulf Coast closed parking lots because they were full and there were crowded scenes at Lake of the Ozarks bars in Missouri, per AP, which reports a shooting injured several people at a packed Daytona Beach in Florida on Sunday.

Republicans sue California over mail-out ballot plan

California Gov. Gavin Newsom during a February news conference in Sacramento, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President Trump accused Democrats of trying to Rig" November's elections as Republican groups filed a lawsuit against California Sunday in an attempt to stop Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) from mailing ballots to all registered voters.

Driving the news: Newsom signed an executive order this month in response to the coronavirus pandemic to make sure all registered voters in the state receive a mail-in ballot.

Federal judge strikes down Florida law requiring felons to pay fines before voting

Gov. Ron DeSantis. Photo: oe Raedle/Getty Images

A federal judge on Sunday ruled that a Florida law requiring convicted felons to pay all court fines and fees before registering to vote is unconstitutional.

Why it matters: The ruling, which will likely be appealed by state Republicans, would clear the way for hundreds of thousands of ex-felons in Florida to register to vote ahead of November's election.

White House announces new coronavirus travel restrictions on Brazil

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro with Trump, March 19, 2019. Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool via Getty Images

The White House announced that beginning at 11:59 pm ET on Thursday, President Trump would suspend entry of non-U.S. citizens who have been in Brazil in the past 14 days in an effort to stop the imported spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Brazil has reported nearly 350,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus — the second-most in the world behind the U.S. — and has emerged as a Southern Hemisphere hotspot as other heavily affected countries in Asia and Europe have managed to get their outbreaks under control.

Trumpworld's plan to brand Biden

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, Mandel Ngan/AFP

Trump's advisers relish the contrast between his public appearances and Joe Biden's lack thereof. The former vice president, following the guidance of public experts, has eschewed public events and stayed home for months now. Trump, meanwhile, is out and about — masks be damned.

What we're hearing: Watch for plenty more mask-free outings from Trump, hyping the reopening of the economy and avoiding discussions of social distancing and death counts.

Scoop: Inside the secret talks to overhaul the GOP platform

Jared Kushner. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

For the past six months, top Trump campaign officials, reporting to Jared Kushner, have been working on a radical overhaul of the Republican Party platform.

Driving the news: The Trump campaign's Bill Stepien has been leading the process, working with campaign colleagues and the Republican National Committee. As with all significant campaign matters, they've been reporting back to Kushner.

Beijing says U.S. should give up "wishful thinking" of changing China

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Photo: Artyom Ivanov\Tass via Getty Images.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said on Sunday that the U.S. should stop its "wishful thinking" of trying to change China, accusing the Trump administration of taking actions that are pushing the two nations toward a "new Cold War," Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: U.S.-China relations have grown increasingly sour during the coronavirus pandemic. President Trump and many of his Republican allies directly blame the Communist Party's cover-up in the early days of the Wuhan outbreak for allowing the virus to spread throughout the world.

Trump slams study that suggests earlier lockdown could have saved 36,000 lives

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump attacked estimates from a Columbia University study on Sunday that projected at least 36,000 American lives could have been saved if lockdowns and social distancing were imposed just one week earlier.

What he's saying: Trump told Full Measure, a show broadcast by Sinclair, "It's a disgrace what I watch from this fake news media and from some of these liberal institutions. Columbia is a liberal, disgraceful institution to write that because all the people that they cater to were months after me, they said we shouldn't close it."

Boris Johnson backs top aide amid reports of lockdown violations

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson came out in support of top aide Dominic Cummings Sunday after a joint investigation by the Daily Mirror and The Guardian found Cummings had traveled 260 miles in April to visit his parents while exhibiting coronavirus symptoms.

The latest: "In traveling to find the right kind of child care, at a moment when both he and his wife were about to be incapacitated by coronavirus, and when he had no alternative, I think he followed the instincts of every father and every parent and I do not mark him down for that," Johnson said Sunday.

Go deeper (2 min. read)ArrowUpdated 21 hours ago - World

O'Brien: U.S. likely to impose sanctions if China moves ahead with Hong Kong law

White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday that the U.S. government will likely impose economic sanctions on Hong Kong and China if Beijing moves ahead with a proposed national security law for Hong Kong that could constrain the special region's autonomy.

Why it matters: O'Brien said the U.S. could revoke a special status that allows Hong Kong to function as an international financial hub, stating that it's "hard to see" how the financial community can remain in the city if the law is enacted.

Ohio governor condemns politics in face mask debate

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) denounced the partisanship that has infiltrated the debate over face masks in the U.S., telling NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday: "This is not about politics. ... It's about helping other people."

Why it matters: Face masks have become a political symbol for some Americans in the brewing culture war over containing the coronavirus, AP reports. 76% of Democrats say they wear a mask when leaving home, compared to 59% of Republicans, according to a poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Hassett says unemployment rate could still be in double digits by election

White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that it's possible the unemployment rate could still be in double digits by November's election, but "all the signs of economic recovery are going to be raging everywhere" by that time.

The big picture: Hassett said the unemployment rate next month will be "quite a bit higher" than April's rate of 14.7%, and likely "north of 20%." But he projected that June will be an "inflection point" and the unemployment rate will start to "trend down" after that.

Birx: If you can't social distance outside, you "must wear a mask"

White House coronavirus task force coordinator Deborah Birx said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that social distancing is "absolutely critical" and that if Americans can't maintain at least 6 feet from other people while gathering outside, they "must wear a mask."

Why it matters: As states have begun to reopen, many Americans have flocked to beaches and outdoor restaurants in large numbers to celebrate Memorial Day weekend. Birx warned that people could be spreading the virus unknowingly, and she asked those with comorbidities to remain sheltered in place.

New York Times front page honors Covid-19 victims as death toll nears 100,000

The stark front page of today's New York Times, plus three inside pages, consist of two-line obituaries ("Always first on the dance floor. ... Preferred bolo ties and suspenders") for 1,000 of the nearly 100,000 Americans who have died of the coronavirus — 1% of the toll.

The big picture: A huge team at The Times drew the accounts "from hundreds of obituaries, news articles and paid death notices that have appeared in newspapers and digital media over the past few months."

Go deeper (1 min. read)ArrowUpdated 24 hours ago - Health

America's oldest military ally in Asia turns toward China

Duterte (R) visits Xi in Beijing. Photo: Ng Han Guan-Pool/Getty Images

When the Philippines needed resources to fight its coronavirus outbreak, it turned not to its American allies, but to China.

Why it matters: The Philippines was a U.S. colony for half a century and is America’s oldest military ally in Asia. But the Southeast Asian nation is drifting further from the U.S. and toward America's superpower rival.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space

Hope during coronavirus: Return to space

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

It would already be a huge event if Wednesday's SpaceX launch was just the return to launching astronauts on U.S. rockets for the first time in nearly a decade.

But throw in the fact that it will also be the first orbital launch of U.S. astronauts by a private company — and the fact that it's happening in the middle of a pandemic — and you have a seismic historical event. And it just might give Americans something inspiring to talk about at a time when everyone needs it.

Netanyahu goes on trial in corruption case

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's trial on charges of bribery, fraud and breach of trust is set to start in Jerusalem District Court on Sunday. He strongly denies all charges.

Why it matters: Netanyahu is Israel's first sitting prime minister to go on trial on corruption charges. He's the country's longest-serving leader and was sworn into office for a fourth consecutive term exactly a week ago.

Go deeper (1 min. read)ArrowUpdated May 24, 2020 - World

Hong Kong police fire tear gas during mass China security law protest

Police fire tear gas on protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday. Photo: Isaac Lawrence/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong police used tear gas on thousands of protesters marching through the city on Sunday against China's plans to implement a national security law, per The Guardian.

Of note: This is the biggest mass gathering since Beijing's encroachment on Hong Kong's independent legal system sparked huge protests last year. Reuters reported earlier that police warned protesters not to break the ban on gatherings of more than eight people, a restriction imposed to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Go deeper (1 min. read)ArrowUpdated May 24, 2020 - World

Trump to Sessions: You ruined many lives over Russia probe recusal

Jeff Sessions. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Image

President Trump accused his former Attorney General Jeff Sessions Saturday evening of lacking courage when he recused himself from the Russia investigation.

Driving the news: Trump made the comment in a retweet of the former AG's Twitter post defending himself the previous evening following the president's endorsement of Sessions' rival for the Alabama Senate seat.