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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 a.m. ET: 1,203,923 — Total deaths: 64,795 — Total recoveries: 247,273Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 a.m. ET: 312,237 — Total deaths: 8,502 — Total recoveries: 14,997Map.
  3. Public health latest: CDC launches national trackers and recommends face coverings in public. Federal government will cover costs of COVID-19 treatment for uninsured. The virus is hitting poor, minority communities harder and upending childbirth.
  4. 2020 latest: "We have no contingency plan," Trump said on the 2020 Republican National Convention. "We're having the convention at the end of August."
  5. Business updates: Restaurants step up for health care workers. Employees are pressuring companies to provide protections during coronavirus.
  6. Oil latest: Monday meeting among oil-producing countries to discuss supply curbs is reportedly being delayed amid tensions between Saudi Arabia and Russia.
  7. Education update: Many college-age students won't get coronavirus relief checks.
  8. 1 🏀 thing: The WNBA postpones start of training camps and season.
  9. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal health. Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  10. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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World coronavirus updates: Confirmed cases top 1.2 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The number of novel coronavirus cases surpassed 1.2 million worldwide Saturday night, as Spain overtook Italy as the country with the most infections outside the U.S.

The big picture: About half the planet's population is now on lockdown and the global death toll was nearing 64,800, by Sunday morning, per Johns Hopkins data.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 47 mins ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates: Death toll surpasses 8,500

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Recorded deaths from the novel coronavirus surpassed 8,500 in the U.S. early Sunday, per Johns Hopkins data. The death toll in the U.S. has risen over 1,000 every day for the past four days, since April 1.

The big picture: President Trump said Saturday America's is facing its "toughest" time "between this week and next week." Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said U.S. deaths are expected to continue to rise during this period.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

Cruise ship docks in Miami with 2 dead after coronavirus outbreak

An ambulance takes a patient from the cruise ship Coral Princess to hospital from the Port of Miami, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Two Coral Princess passengers died before the cruise ship docked at the Port of Miami, Florida, Saturday following a novel coronavirus outbreak, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez said. The cause of their deaths was not immediately disclosed.

The big picture: The ship was carrying 1,020 guests and 878 crew members from Chile, operator Princess Cruises said. 12 of those on board tested positive for COVID-19, the firm said last Thursday. Five people were taken to hospital from the vessel, Gimenez said. Disembarkation is expected to take several days. 65 people would remain onboard under quarantine for now because their symptoms or medical conditions left them unfit to travel, Gimenez said. Princess Cruises announced last month it was pausing global operations for two months because of the outbreak.

Go deeper: Carnival CEO defends coronavirus response

In photos: Life in the era of coronavirus across the U.S.

Lauryn Morley, a lower school substitute teacher for the Washington Waldorf School in Bethesda, Maryland, works from her home in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The number of novel coronavirus cases in the U.S. has grown from one on Jan. 21 to over 312,000 by early Sunday, per Johns Hopkins.

The big picture: Roughly 3/4 of the American population is on lockdown, with social distancing measures and other orders in place across the country. Here's how Americans are coping with the massive upheaval the outbreak has brought, in photos.

See photosArrow3 hours ago - Health

Trump blasts U.S. Navy captain who sounded alarm about coronavirus

President Trump briefs reports on April 4. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump on Saturday said he agreed with the Pentagon's decision to relieve Capt. Brett Crozier of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt after the captain sent a letter to officials pleading for help as members of his crew contracted the coronavirus.

What he's saying: "The letter was a five page letter from a captain, and the letter was all over the place," Trump said at a White House briefing on Saturday. "That's not appropriate. I don't think that's appropriate. And these are tough people. These are tough, strong people. I thought it looked terrible, to be honest with you."

CDC launches hospitalization and coronavirus fatality trackers

A medical worker at Wyckoff Hospital in Brooklyn on April 4. Photo: Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched two new national tracking tools for the novel coronavirus in the U.S. on Saturday — one to monitor fatalities and another for hospitalizations.

Why it matters: The coronavirus testing kit shortage has challenged public health experts' ability to understand the scope of the outbreak in the U.S., NPR reports. States have scrambled to produce their own systems and monitor the data.

Go deeperArrow11 hours ago - Health

Workers press companies for protective measures

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Companies are scrambling to reorganize operations and add protections for employees after a surge of public protests by workers who are fearful of contracting the coronavirus on the job.

Why it matters: America is relying on grocery clerks, warehouse personnel and factory workers for food and other necessities. If they get sick, supply chains could break down, further threatening the teetering U.S. economy.

Go deeperArrow12 hours ago - Health

How the coronavirus is upending childbirth

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Expectant mothers are facing some daunting new realities amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Reality check: Some doctors, especially in areas that haven't seen large numbers of cases yet, are encouraging women to induce their labor. That can help keep mothers and babies out of the hospital later, when the risk of a coronavirus infection will be higher, and also helps free up beds that may be needed for COVID-19 patients.

Go deeperArrow12 hours ago - Health

Coronavirus Q&A: Pets, moving and personal health

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As the coronavirus continues to spread throughout the U.S., Axios is answering readers' questions about the pandemic — how it spreads, who's at risk, and what you can do to stay safe.

What's new: This week, we answer four questions looking at pets' vulnerability, moving during a pandemic, when to speak with medical professionals, and immunity.

Go deeperArrow13 hours ago - Health

Coronavirus hits poor, minority communities harder

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The coronavirus doesn't discriminate, but minorities and low-income families are bearing the brunt.

Why it matters: The impact of the coronavirus is reflecting the racial and socioeconomic disparities of the cities where it’s spreading and the health care system that’s struggling to contain it.

Go deeperArrow13 hours ago - Health

Restaurants step up for health care workers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Chefs that can't serve their usual customers are finding ways to use their kitchens to feed health care workers.

Why it matters: Health care workers on the front lines of fighting the coronavirus need support. As chefs step up to offer meals, fundraising for their efforts enables them to hire back some of their laid off staff.

Go deeperArrow13 hours ago - Health

NYT: Nearly 40k flew to U.S. from China after Trump's coronavirus travel ban

Air China employees at LAX Tom Bradley International Terminal on Feb. 2 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images

Nearly 40,000 Americans and authorized travelers have come into the U.S. from China since President Trump imposed travel restrictions more than two months ago, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Trump has suggested that his action to ban foreigners from entering the U.S. if they were in China before early February has contributed to lower COVID-19 cases and fatalities in the U.S.

Go deeperArrow14 hours ago - Health

The desperate hunt for coronavirus personal protective equipment

Photo: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Counterfeiters and scammers have emerged as the global supply of protective personal equipment continues to dwindle and the search ramps up to find material for healthcare workers treating coronavirus, AP reports.

The big picture: The desperate hunt for protective medical supplies and equipment to fight the pandemic is pitting nation against nation and forcing governors to compete against each other and the federal government — all while the coronavirus death toll continues to rise. America's relations with its trade partners are being tested as it blocks and outbids other nations seeking masks, per The Washington Post.

Go deeperArrow14 hours ago - Health

The stimulus package has a college gap

Photo: Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images

Congress’ CARES Act will send one-time relief checks to most Americans. But many adults who are tax dependents won’t get a cut of the more than $300 billion set to be distributed in direct payments.

Yes, but: Adults who can be claimed as dependents on another person's tax return don't qualify either for the $1,200 checks or for the $500 add-on for each child.

Telemedicine doesn't waste a crisis

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

We're going to see more medical care delivered remotely — both during the pandemic and after.

The big picture: Health care has always been one of our most regulated industries, which slows the pace of innovation. But the emergency nature of COVID-19 is taking the shackles off telemedicine.

Go deeperArrow15 hours ago - Health

The pandemic shows why we're never ready for the big one

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As the confirmed number of COVID-19 cases passed 1 million on Friday, two words sum up the U.S. response to the coronavirus: not enough. Not enough hospital beds, not enough ventilators, not enough protective equipment. Not enough preparation.

Why it matters: COVID-19 has demonstrated our normal defenses aren't enough in the face of a low-probability, but high-consequence catastrophe.

Go deeperArrow16 hours ago - Health

China donates 1,000 ventilators to New York

A ventilator and other hospital equipment in Central Park on March 30. Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

A donation of 1,000 ventilators from China will arrive in New York state on Saturday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a press conference.

The big picture: Health care workers and the federal government are scrambling to stretch limited inventories of medical equipment to fight the coronavirus crisis, as the U.S. won't be able to manufacture enough medical masks and ventilators in time for a surge in demand expected to hit in mid-April.

Go deeperArrow16 hours ago - Health

Barr orders broadened use of home confinement as coronavirus hits prisons

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr instructed the Bureau of Prisons on Friday to expand the use of home confinement and accelerate the release of eligible, high-risk inmates at three federal correctional facilities struck by the coronavirus, AP reports.

The state of play: As of Friday evening, 91 inmates and 50 staff had tested positive for COVID-19 at federal prisons across the U.S., per the agency.

Military scrambles to recruit during coronavirus pandemic

Photo: Ryan M. Breeden/U.S. Navy via Getty Images

The U.S. military is struggling to find new recruits as the novel coronavirus has shut down most enlistment stations and forced scouts to get online instead, AP reports.

Why it matters: If stay-at-home orders and mandated social distancing across the country persist, the armed forces may fail to meet annual recruitment goals. That could result in pressure for existing troops to reenlist to maintain military readiness, AP writes.

Go deeperArrow18 hours ago - Health

Coronavirus reshapes American families

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

It used to be scarce and hard-earned, but suddenly family time is abundant in the era of shelter-in-place.

Why it matters: For the first time since the early 19th century, many parents and kids — and even grandchildren — are all under the same roof round-the-clock. And if past periods of emergency are any guide, this enforced togetherness could deepen our relationships for years to come.

Go deeperArrow21 hours ago - Health

Trump invokes DPA to target "wartime profiteers" of medical equipment

President Trump answers questions from reporters on April 3. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump accused "wartime profiteers" of buying, hoarding and exporting medical equipment and protective gear on Friday, in a Defense Production Act directive for FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security to prevent such conduct.

The big picture: Health care workers and the federal government are scrambling to stretch limited inventories of medical equipment to fight the coronavirus crisis, as the U.S. is unlikely to be able to manufacture enough medical masks and ventilators in time for a surge in demand expected to hit in mid-April.

Montana governor says every county has opted to expand mail-in voting

Photo: Barbara Davidson/Getty Images

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock said on Friday that every county has opted to expand mail-in voting for the state's June 2 primary, which is not expected to be delayed. Options outside of mail-in ballots are still available to constituents, Bullock said at a press conference.

Why it matters: 23 other states and the District of Columbia haven't held primaries yet. The White House is recommending, for now, that Americans practice social distancing and gather in groups of no more than 10 people — while more than 40 states have issued stay-at-home orders.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Apr 4, 2020 - Politics & Policy
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