Health

Why it matters: The U.S. faces a range of health care flashpoints — unaffordable drugs, opioids, vaping — as we debate whether to adopt universal care. For now, the Affordable Care Act is the law of the land, but Republicans want to issue it a final death blow.

All health stories

Updated 55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.
2 hours ago - Health

FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage

A medical worker handling a coronavirus test in Charlestown, Massachusetts, on Aug. 11. Photo: Matt Stone/ MediaNews Group/Boston Herald

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday released its first-ever list of medical devices needed to respond to the coronavirus that are in short supply.

Why it matters: The list includes surgical gowns, gloves, masks, certain ventilators and testing supplies that medical workers require to effectively respond to the pandemic, which has infected more than 5.3 million people in the U.S. to date, according to Johns Hopkins University.

4 hours ago - Health

California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases

A healthcare worker in Los Angeles handling a coronavirus test on. Aug 11. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

California reported almost 8,000 new coronavirus cases on Friday, bringing the state's tally to more than 600,000 since the pandemic began, according to the state's Department of Public Health.

Why it matters: California is the first state to surpass the 600,000-case milestone. It also reported 188 deaths associated with the virus on Friday, bumping its total to almost 11,000 — the third-highest death toll in the U.S. behind New York and New Jersey, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Updated 5 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

Spain's government announced on Friday that it will shut down nightclubs, ban public smoking and restrict nursing home visits as coronavirus cases climb in the country.

By the numbers: Over 761,000 people have died of the novel coronavirus globally and another 21 million have tested positive, per Johns Hopkins University data. More than 13 million have recovered from the virus.

CDC: Those who recover from COVID-19 have 3-month window for safe mingling

Test tubes with blood samples of donors that have developed antibodies against the coronavirus. Photo: Robin Utrecht/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its guidance Friday evening suggesting that those who recover from the coronavirus can safely socialize for three months thereafter.

Why it matters: This is the agency's first public acknowledgement that immunity to COVID-19 could persist for at least three months.

9 hours ago - World

Spain introduces new coronavirus restrictions as cases surge

Madrid's health minister Enrique Ruiz Escudero. Photo: Jesus Hellin/ Europa Press via Getty Images

Spain's government announced Friday that it will shut down nightclubs, ban public smoking and restrict nursing home visits as coronavirus cases climb in the country, per the AP.

The state of play: Spain's daily cases have almost reached the highs seen in March and April when the country was one of Europe's worst-hit, per Johns Hopkins data. So far during this surge, the nation's reported deaths are nowhere near the rate seen in the spring.

Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light

Photo: Stan Honda/AFP via Getty Images

"Tribute in Light," the iconic twin beams of light meant to represent the World Trade Center's towers, won't shine on September 11 this year after organizers expressed concern for the health of workers who would set up the display, per the AP.

What's happening: The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is organizing an alternative display as well as prerecorded remarks from victims' families in lieu of its traditional in-person ceremonies.

13 hours ago - Health

Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with coronavirus vaccine

Photo: Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images

Anthony Fauci told PBS NewsHour on Thursday that he expects the U.S. could "be as good [as] back to normal as we possibly can" by the end of 2021 if a coronavirus vaccine becomes widely available.

The big picture: Fauci made clear that this would not mean the virus is eradicated, saying, "We can get it under good enough control that it is so low that it doesn't interfere with the kind of normal life that we want to get the economy back, to get employment back."

17 hours ago - Health

The pandemic's toll on mental health

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

One in four Americans between 18 and 24 years old say they've considered suicide in the past month because of the pandemic, according to a survey from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Why it matters: The findings confirm warnings from public health experts about the long-term mental health impacts from the pandemic.

17 hours ago - Health

The kids who are most at risk from the coronavirus

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus isn't as deadly for children as it is for adults, but kids still get it and can still get seriously sick from it. The risk is higher for Black and Hispanic children.

Why it matters: In communities with high caseloads, cases among children could explode as schools reopen. And kids in the communities already hit hardest by the pandemic are the most at risk.

More health stories