Donald Trump

The big picture

Trump's failing culture wars

The president's quest for a viral attack line against Biden may be driving him to diverge even more politically.

Jul 5, 2020
Tech finally begins a crackdown on Trump

Social media platforms are beginning to turn down the volume on the president's megaphone.

Jun 30, 2020
The cracks in Trump’s GOP shield

It’s a sign of how brazen his latest statements have gotten.

May 31, 2020
10 times Trump and his administration were warned about coronavirus

Dr. Anthony Fauci admitted that more lives could have been saved if earlier action was taken.

Apr 12, 2020
Trump’s playbook for planting suspicion

Trump's Ukraine campaign against Biden fits a similar pattern of attacks.

Sep 29, 2019
Trump’s threat rollercoaster: He’s bluffing, until he’s not

His track record shows he carries out enough threats that they can't be dismissed.

Jun 13, 2019

All Donald Trump stories

Trump to announce revision to environmental law that protects minority communities

President Trump. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump is reportedly planning to announce an overhaul to a law on Wednesday that could prevent low-income and minority communities from voicing concerns about projects that could pollute their neighborhoods, The Washington Post writes.

Why it matters: Trump is expected to argue that the National Environmental Policy Act, signed into law by President Nixon in 1970, would create jobs by making it easier for his administration to build infrastructure including highways, pipelines and chemical plants. The Post notes that such projects pose major environmental threats.

Trump deflects on why Black people are killed by police: "And so are white people"

Asked by CBS News' Catherine Herridge on Tuesday why Black Americans are still dying at the hands of police, President Trump responded: "And so are white people. So are white people. What a terrible question to ask."

Why it matters: A 2018 study found that Black men are about 3.5 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement than their white counterparts.

Judge lifts restraining order on Mary Trump on eve of book release

Photo: Simon & Schuster

A New York judge on Monday lifted the temporary restraining order that had prevented Mary Trump from publicly discussing a tell-all book set to be released July 14 about her uncle, President Trump.

Why it matters: Mary Trump, a trained psychologist, portrays the president as a dangerous sociopath and alleges in her book that Donald Trump's sister Maryanne had concerns about her brother's fitness for office, among other things.

Roger Stone says he plans to campaign for Trump

Roger Stone appears yesterday outside his home in Fort Lauderdale. Photo: Johnny Louis/Getty Images

Roger Stone told Axios in a phone interview that he plans to write and speak for President Trump's re-election now that Stone "won't die in a squalid hellhole of corona-19 virus."

"I'm asthmatic," said Stone, 67. "Sending me to a prison where I could not be socially distanced ... would, I think, be a death sentence."

Anti-Trump "Lincoln Project" raised $16.8 million this quarter

Photo: Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Advisers to the Lincoln Project, a group of anti-Trump Republicans that has produced a number of the election cycle's most viral political attack ads, tell the Washington Post that it has raised $16.8 million this quarter.

Why it matters: The group, along with Republican Voters Against Trump, has launched a campaign against Trump with a "particular emphasis on persuading white suburban voters who consider themselves true Republicans to break from the president," the Post writes.

Trump dons face mask during Walter Reed visit

Trump wearing a face mask in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on July 11. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump wore a face mask during his Saturday visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, according to AP.

Why it matters: This is the first known occasion the president has appeared publicly with a facial covering as recommended by health officials since the coronavirus pandemic began, AP writes.

Fauci hasn't briefed Trump on coronavirus in at least two months

Anthony Fauci with President Trump in May at the White House. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told the Financial Times on Friday that he last saw President Trump in person at the White House on June 2 — and hasn't briefed the president on the coronavirus pandemic for at least two months.

Why it matters: His comments indicate that a rift may be growing between Trump and his top infection disease expert as the worst pandemic in a century surges in multiple states around the U.S.

Polls show Trump has fight on his hands in Kansas and Montana

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Public and private polling shows President Trump "not only trailing badly in swing states like Michigan and Wisconsin, but running closely with [Joe] Biden in traditionally conservative bastions like Kansas and Montana," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Trump won each of those states in 2016 by 20 points. If he's in dogfights there, his map is on fire.

Romney calls Stone commutation "historic corruption"

Sen. Mitt Romney. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) on Saturday tweeted a scathing response to President Trump's Friday night commutation of former associate Roger Stone's prison sentence, calling the move "[u]nprecedented, historic corruption."

Why it matters: Romney has emerged as the party's most prominent Trump critic. He sent shockwaves through Washington after announcing he would vote to convict Trump in the impeachment trial — becoming the only Senate Republican to break ranks and vote for the president's removal from office. Now he is the first major GOP lawmaker to condemn Trump's Friday night call regarding Stone.

What they're saying: Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump commuted the 40-month prison sentence of his longtime associate and confidante Roger Stone on Friday.

Why it matters: Stone, the seventh person to be convicted and sentenced for crimes unearthed by former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, will spend no time behind bars for obstructing justice, tampering with witnesses and making false statements to Congress.

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