Immigration

The big picture

Immigrants on the front lines in the coronavirus fight

They're America's doctors, cab drivers and farm workers.

Apr 3, 2020
Trump doesn't need a border wall

The administration's growing armory of immigration rules, policies and agreements have already proven to be all but impenetrable.

Jan 14, 2020
Immigration is shaping the youngest generation of voters

29% of Gen Z are immigrants or the children of immigrants, compared to 23% of millennials at the same age.

Dec 14, 2019
Deep Dive: A widening world without a home

If all the refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people were a country, they'd be the 21st most populous nation in the world.

Dec 15, 2018

All Immigration stories

GAO finds Chad Wolf, Ken Cuccinelli are ineligible for top DHS roles

Photo: CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf and his acting deputy Ken Cuccinelli are ineligible to be serving in their positions, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) decided in a report released Friday.

Why it matters: While the finding has no immediate power, it could be important evidence in litigation over policies enacted under Wolf and Cuccinelli's leadership, said America's Voice's Ur Jaddou, who served as chief counsel to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) under President Obama.

Supreme Court denies request to halt construction on Trump border wall

President Trump and the border wall in June. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-4 vote on Friday rejected a request from environmental groups to prevent construction of portions of the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Why it matters: The ruling lets the administration continue building despite pending appeals to a case on whether the administration can use Defense Department funding for border wall construction.

Judge blocks Trump administration's "public charge" rule on immigrants during pandemic

Ken Cuccinelli, senior official performing the duties of the deputy secretary of Homeland Security, in March. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A federal judge in New York on Wednesday blocked the Trump administration from denying permanent residency to immigrants who are likely to use public welfare programs during the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: Judge George Daniels said that denying immigrants green cards as part the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services "public charge" rule could harm mitigation efforts during the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump administration to allow yearlong renewals for current DACA recipients

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Trump administration is allowing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients to renew their protections under the program for one year as officials begin a review of DACA and how the administration attempted to end it, a senior administration official announced Tuesday.

Between the lines: Despite the Supreme Court ruling that Trump illegally ended the Obama-era program in June and a federal judge ruling earlier this month that it must be restored to its full status, the administration will continue to reject new applications, according to the official.

Exclusive poll: Where immigration could swing critical 2020 voters

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images, Banaras Khan/AFP via Getty Images, and Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

Immigration could resurface as a potent issue in the presidential election, with millions open to shifting from President Trump to Joe Biden or vice versa depending on how the issue is framed, according to data from Civis Analytics for Immigration Hub shared exclusively with Axios.

Driving the news: Immigration Hub, an advocacy group, commissioned a survey of more than 9,000 voters in Wisconsin, Michigan, Colorado and Pennsylvania to see if a voting bloc existed that could be moved toward Democrats with pro-immigration content.

States would lose House seats if census excludes unauthorized immigrants

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California, Texas and Florida would each lose at least one House seat they otherwise would have won if unauthorized immigrants were removed from the U.S. Census count this year, the Pew Research Center found.

Driving the news: The White House is looking to exclude this population, per a new policy announced this week. President Trump said he has discretion to decide who is considered an "inhabitant" of the U.S. for apportionment purposes.

Trump targets congressional representation for undocumented immigrants

Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

President Trump issued a memorandum Tuesday that aims to exclude undocumented immigrants from influencing congressional apportionment determined by the 2020 Census.

Why it matters: The move is sure to provoke legal challenges. Supreme Court precedent has interpreted the Constitution as requiring congressional districts to be appointed by total population, Reuters notes.

Scoop: Trump's license to skirt the law

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump and top White House officials are privately considering a controversial strategy to act without legal authority to enact new federal policies — starting with immigration, administration officials tell Axios.

Between the lines: The White House thinking is being heavily influenced by John Yoo, the lawyer who wrote the Bush administration's justification for waterboarding after 9/11.

Updated Jul 18, 2020 - Politics & Policy

DHS, DOJ announce plans to restart migrant asylum hearings

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security on Friday announced plans to resume hearings for migrants who are seeking asylum in the U.S., as part of the Migrant Protection Protocols program during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why it matters: The MPP program requires migrants to wait in Mexico until their hearings can be completed. But the coronavirus outbreak has put immigration proceedings on hold since March, forcing hundreds of migrants to camp out at the border in the interim.

Trump administration rescinds foreign student visa guidance

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Trump administration is rescinding new guidance from Immigrations and Customs Enforcement that would have forced some international students to transfer schools or leave the U.S. if their classes were held completely online in the fall.

Why it matters: The guidance was immediately met with broad backlash and lawsuits backed by more than 200 universities and 18 states. The decision to rescind the guidance and return to the policy in place since March was announced in a Tuesday hearing for the lawsuit brought by Harvard and MIT.

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