Politics & Policy

Why it matters: While Democrats fight to convince voters that they should be the ones tasked with taking down President Trump, the current administration is powering ahead on efforts to restrict immigration, unleash business and reshape the U.S. role in the world.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 662,073 — Total deaths: 30,780 — Total recoveries: 139,426.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 122,666 — Total deaths: 2,147 — Total recoveries: 1,073.
  3. Federal government latest: President Trump announces "strong" travel advisories for New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, rules out quarantine enforcement.
  4. State updates: Alaska is latest state to issue a stay-at-home order — New York is trying to nearly triple its hospital capacity in less than a month and has moved its presidential primary to June 23. Some Midwestern swing voters who backed Trump's handling of the virus less than two weeks ago are balking at his call for the U.S. to be "opened up" by Easter.
  5. World updates: In Spain, over 1,400 people were confirmed dead between Thursday to Saturday.
  6. 🚀 Space updates: OneWeb filed for bankruptcy amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.
  7. Hollywood: Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson have returned to U.S. after being treated for coronavirus.
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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NRA sues California officials for designating gun stores non-essential

Photo: Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association and other pro-gun groups filed a lawsuit against California Gov. Gavin Newsom and state officials on Friday after gun stores were deemed non-essential and required to close for the state's stay-at-home order amid the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: Both Second Amendment advocates and gun control backers argue that shutting federally licensed firearms dealers could push buyers to purchase guns online or through private sales without background checks, per AP.

Some Ivy League schools increase rate of admissions

Harvard University campus. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Some Ivy League schools saw freshman admission rates slightly tick up this year, reversing a multi-year trend of frantic competition and scrutiny over the selective spots, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Why now: The novel coronavirus has presented colleges with a variety of challenges, with the pandemic confusing enrollment projections for the coming academic year. Some schools took students off waitlists or changed their denials and admitted them to ensure they enroll full classes, per the WSJ.

Trump considers quarantine for states near epicenter of U.S. coronavirus outbreak

President Trump speaks to the press on March 28 in Washington, DC. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

President Trump said on Saturday he is considering a "short term" quarantine of New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut — areas congruent with the New York metro area, the epicenter of the novel coronavirus in the U.S.

Reality check: These states have already taken steps to quarantine residents and promote social distancing to combat COVID-19. The governors of New York and New Jersey issued statewide stay-at-home orders last week, and non-essential businesses in Connecticut were ordered to close as of this Monday.

New York is latest state to delay primary due to coronavirus

Photo: Barbara Davidson/Getty Images

New York — the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. — has moved its presidential primary to June 23, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Saturday.

Why it matters: 23 other states and the District of Columbia haven't held primaries yet. The White House is recommending, for now, that Americans practice social distancing and gather in groups of no more than 10 people — while many states have issued stay-at-home orders.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Civil rights leader Rev. Joseph Lowery dies at 98

In May 1970, the Rev. Joseph Lowery (striped tie) and Coretta Scott King (with handbag) lock arms with UAW president Leonard Woodcock as they lead several thousand marchers past the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta. Photo: AP Photo

Rev. Joseph Lowery fought to end segregation, and lived to see the election of the United States' first black president, AP writes.

The big picture: Lowery was born in Huntsville, Ala., in 1921. He helped coordinate the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, leading the organization for 20 years as president.

Podcast: Inside Trump's coronavirus timeline

President Trump pledged to reopen the U.S. economy by Easter, a date that most medical experts agree is too soon to effectively contain the spread of the novel coronavirus. Dan digs into the backstory and what comes next with Axios' Jonathan Swan.

Go deeper: Coronavirus dashboard

Focus group: Minnesota swing voters balk at Trump's Easter deadline

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A group of Midwestern swing voters that supported President Trump's handling of the coronavirus less than two weeks ago is balking at his call for the U.S. to be "opened up" by Easter, saying they'll tolerate business closures for as long as it takes to contain the spread.

Why it matters: Their feedback suggests that some voters otherwise mostly supportive of the president — and who still see financial threats outpacing health threats — aren't so tired of social distancing that they're willing to risk ending it too quickly.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 14 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden blasts Trump's coronavirus response: "This is not personal"

Former Vice President Joe Biden said that President Trump should "stop personalizing everything" in his approach to dealing the novel coronavirus pandemic, at a CNN town hall on Friday.

Driving the news: "If they don't treat you right, I don't call," Trump told reporters at the White House coronavirus task force briefing on Friday, referring to managing COVID-19. Trump said Vice President Mike Pence "calls all the governors," but he advises Pence against contacting those he views as unappreciative.

Trump says he advises coronavirus task force not to contact unappreciative governors

President Trump briefs reports at the White House on March 27. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

"If they don't treat you right, I don't call," President Trump told reporters at the White House coronavirus task force briefing on Friday, referring to U.S. governors battling the spread of COVID-19.

What he's saying: Trump said that while "generally speaking," the nation's governors have been appreciative of his administration's efforts to combat the spread of COVID-19, there are some — including Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer — who the task force should not bother contacting.

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