Lobbying

Elizabeth Warren unveils sweeping anti-corruption plan

Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks at a Democratic Party convention.
Elizabeth Warren speaks at Massachusetts' Democratic Party convention. Photo: Preston Ehrler/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

2020 Democratic contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren released Monday a massive new plan to prevent corruption in Washington, D.C., as a part of her promise to institute what she calls "the most sweeping set of anti-corruption reforms since Watergate" if elected.

Why it matters: If enacted, the wide-ranging proposal would dramatically restructure the federal government by limiting lobbyists' influence on Congress, expanding protections for workers and requiring federal judges to publicly post their financial reports and speeches.

The provider lobby takes on Congress

Illustration of a giant health plus on top of a pile of cash, the ground underneath is cracking.
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Ending surprise medical bills inspires bipartisan kumbaya in a way nearly unheard of these days, and yet a brutal lobbying and public relations blitz by doctor and hospital groups is threatening to kill the entire effort.

Driving the news: Provider-backed groups are spending millions of dollars to sway lawmakers and the public opinion against Congress's efforts to ban surprise billing, according to a handful of recent reports.