Updated Nov 22, 2019

The highlights from all of the public impeachment hearings

The view before Marie Yovanovitch's impeachment hearing. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House Intelligence Committee wrapped up on Thursday its planned schedule of public testimony in its impeachment inquiry, holding seven hearings with 12 witnesses over the past two weeks.

The big picture: The committee heard hours of testimony from witnesses who were both working on the ground in Ukraine and within the Trump administration at the time of the alleged White House pressure campaign against the Ukrainian government to secure an investigation into the Biden family's business dealings.

Nov. 13: Bill Taylor and George Kent's testimony

  • In a new revelation, Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, testified that a member of his staff overheard EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland on July 26 discussing "the investigations" on a phone call with Trump.

Nov. 15: Marie Yovanovitch's testimony

  • Trump took to Twitter as Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, testified to attack her diplomatic career, saying that everywhere she served "went bad." Yovanovitch said that she felt the tweets were "very intimidating" after House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) read them to her.

Nov. 19, a.m.: Alexander Vindman and Jennifer Williams' testimony

  • Vindman, the National Security Council's top Ukraine expert, and Williams, an aide to Vice President Pence, both used their opening statements to say that they found the July 25 call between Trump and Zelensky to be "improper" and "unusual," respectively.

Nov. 19, p.m.: Kurt Volker and Tim Morrison's testimony

  • Volker, the former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine, was part of a group of officials who worked with Rudy Giuliani to push Ukraine to announce investigations into Trump's political rivals, though he testified Tuesday that he was not aware that the investigation would involve Joe Biden.
  • Morrison, the former National Security Council Russia adviser, testified that Sondland informed him that nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine would be released if Zelensky announced the investigations.

Nov. 20, a.m. Gordon Sondland's testimony

  • Sondland said that he worked with Rudy Giuliani "at the express direction" of President Trump on matters involving Ukraine.
  • He also confirmed that a quid pro quo preconditioning a White House meeting in exchange for an investigation into the Biden family's business dealings in Ukraine took place and "reflected President Trump's desires and requirements."

Nov. 20, p.m.: Laura Cooper and David Hale's testimony

  • Cooper, a Pentagon official, testified that, after the transcript of her closed-door deposition was released on Nov. 11, members of her staff brought her two unclassified State Department emails revealing that the Ukrainian embassy was inquiring about the military aid on July 25 — the same day as Trump's call with Zelensky.

Nov. 21: Fiona Hill and David Holmes' testimony

  • Hill, Trump's former top Russia adviser, testified that a "fictional narrative" about Ukraine and a conspiracy theory alleging its interference in the 2016 presidential election, driven by partisan politics, distracted Trump from the real threat that Russia poses to America's democracy.
  • Hill also said she had a conflict with Sondland over his claim that he was working on Ukraine policy at Trump's direction — to pursue what she termed a "domestic political errand."

What's next, via Axios' Alayna Treene: House Intelligence Committee staffers have been drafting a report that they plan to deliver to the Judiciary Committee in the coming weeks that lays out their case for impeachment, two sources familiar with their plans tell Axios.

  • Democratic members on the Intelligence Committee say they expect the impeachment inquiry to be handed off to Judiciary soon after Thanksgiving recess, if not immediately upon Congress' return.
  • House Democratic leadership is still hoping to wrap their role in the impeachment process by the end of 2019, but they are hesitant to lay out a distinct timeline in case key witnesses close to Trump — like his former national security advisor John Bolton — decide to comply.

Go deeper ... Trump-Ukraine scandal: The key players, dates and documents

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 5,410,228 — Total deaths: 345,105 — Total recoveries — 2,169,005Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 1,643,499 — Total deaths: 97,722 — Total recoveries: 366,736 — Total tested: 14,163,915Map.
  3. World: White House announces travel restrictions on Brazil, coronavirus hotspot in Southern Hemisphere Over 100 coronavirus cases in Germany tied to single day of church services — Boris Johnson backs top aide amid reports that he broke U.K. lockdown while exhibiting symptoms.
  4. Public health: Officials are urging Americans to wear masks headed into Memorial Day weekend Report finds "little evidence" coronavirus under control in most statesHurricanes, wildfires, the flu could strain COVID-19 response
  5. Economy: White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett says it's possible the unemployment rate could still be in double digits by November's election — Public employees brace for layoffs.
  6. Federal government: Trump attacks a Columbia University study that suggests earlier lockdown could have saved 36,000 American lives.
  7. What should I do? Hydroxychloroquine questions answeredTraveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
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Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The CDC is warning of potentially "aggressive rodent behavior" amid a rise in reports of rat activity in several areas, as the animals search further for food while Americans stay home more during the coronavirus pandemic.

By the numbers: More than 97,700 people have died from COVID-19 and over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Over 366,700 Americans have recovered and more than 14.1 million tests have been conducted.

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

Japan's economy minister outlined plans on Monday to end the nationwide state of emergency as the number of new novel coronavirus cases continues to decline to fewer than 50 a day, per Bloomberg. Japan has reported 16,550 cases and 820 deaths.

By the numbers: Over 5.4 million people have tested positive for the virus as of Monday, and more than 2.1 million have recovered. The U.S. has reported the most cases in the world (over 1.6 million from 13.7 million tests). The U.K. is reporting over 36,800 deaths from the coronavirus — the most fatalities outside the U.S.