2017 women's march

Women's March unravels as prominent Democrats go their own way

Illustration of pussy hat unravelling
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Two years ago, the Women's March sparked a movement that propelled a record number of women into politics. But today, it is fractured and so controversial that prominent Democratic women are steering clear of it altogether.

Why it matters: This year's march is scheduled to take place on Saturday in Washington D.C. and 280 other places across the country. But despite its early momentum, the march has become at best an afterthought and at worst politically toxic for elected officials and political organizations that once supported it.

DNC reportedly withdraws Women's March sponsorship

Protesters walk during the Women’s March in January 2017 in Washington, DC.
Protesters walk during the Women’s March in January 2017 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee is the latest in a growing list of institutions to rescind their sponsorship of the national Women’s March, which is facing backlash over claims of anti-Semitism ahead of its annual event on Saturday, The Daily Beast reports.

Why it matters: Women's March co-founder Tamika Mallory appeared on The View Monday and defended her ties to Louis Farrakhan, the controversial leader of the Nation of Islam known for his anti-Semitic rhetoric. Allegations of anti-semitism have clouded this year's march and divided the organization, which in 2017 organized one of the largest protests in U.S. history.