Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg in Hampton, Va., on Tuesday aboard La Vagabonde, the boat she's taking to return to Europe. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg says she can attend the United Nations' climate summit in Spain after all — she's due to set sail across the Atlantic aboard an Australian couple's 48-foot catamaran from Hampton, Va., on Wednesday morning.

The big picture: Thunberg won't fly because of the carbon footprint of air transport. Madrid stepped in to host the Dec. 2–13 UN climate summit after Chile canceled last minute owing to national protests over economic instability.

  • Thunberg requested assistance to attend the talks following the announcement, saying: "It turns out I've traveled half around the world, the wrong way."

What they're saying: Aussies Riley Whitelum and Elayna Carausu, who are documenting their voyage around the world via their Youtube channel "Sailing La Vagabonde," said in a joint statement with Thunberg they decided to help because Thunberg's climate cause is one that's close to their hearts.

  • Thunberg said in the statement that finding a boat "ready to sail back across the North Atlantic in late November is not easy."
  • "But it's amazing to see how many people there are who are willing to help, like Riley, Elayna and Nikki," she said. "By sailing I once again want to highlight the fact that it’s basically impossible to live sustainable in today's societies."

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Federal judge blocks DOJ from defending Trump in Carroll rape defamation case

E. Jean Carroll in Warwick, New York. Photo: Eva Deitch for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal judge on Tuesday dismissed the Justice Department's attempted intervention on behalf of President Trump in writer E. Jean Carroll's defamation lawsuit against him, after she accused him of raping her in a dressing room in the mid-1990s.

Catch up quick: The agency argued that Trump was "acting within the scope of his office" as president when he said in 2019 that Carroll was "lying" about her claim.

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Pre-bunking rises ahead of the 2020 election

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Tech platforms are no longer satisfied with debunking falsehoods — now they're starting to invest in efforts that preemptively show users accurate information to help them counter falsehoods later on.

Why it matters: Experts argue that pre-bunking can be a more effective strategy for combating misinformation than fact-checking. It's also a less polarizing way to address misinformation than trying to apply judgements to posts after they've been shared.