Updated Nov 1, 2019

Madrid to host UN climate meeting

Photo: GlowImages/Getty Images

The United Nations confirmed that Madrid will host next month's climate talks after Chile canceled last minute due to national protests over economic instability, according to the AP.

The big picture: The talks are set for Dec. 2–13. The original host, Brazil, dropped out after the election of President Jair Bolsonaro. Climate activist Greta Thunberg tweeted Friday after the meeting relocation was confirmed, "It turns out I've traveled half around the world, the wrong way." The Swedish teenager refuses to fly because of the carbon footprint of air transport and has requested assistance to attend the UN summit.

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Greta Thunberg to sail from U.S. en route to UN climate summit in Spain

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg in Hampton, Va., on Tuesday aboard La Vagabonde, the boat she's taking to return to Europe. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg says she can attend the United Nations' climate summit in Spain after all — she's due to set sail across the Atlantic aboard an Australian couple's 48-foot catamaran from Hampton, Va., on Wednesday morning.

Go deeperArrowNov 13, 2019

Climate-change confessions of an energy reporter

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

I cover energy and climate change, and yet even I do little to reduce my own environmental footprint.

Why it matters: Because most people don't! Recent polling and research show that most of us don't act virtuously to lessen our impact on the planet, beyond turning off lights when we’re not using them — but even then, many of us do that to save money on our electricity bills.

Go deeperArrowNov 4, 2019

Italy becomes first country to require students to learn about climate change

Students hold a climate march in Palermo, Italy, on Sept. 27. Photo: Francesco Militello Mirto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

All public schools in Italy will require students to learn about climate change and sustainable development starting the next academic year, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Italy is the first country in the world to mandate curriculum on climate change. Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg and students in the U.S. — through the Zero Hour and Sunrise movements — have organized massive protests on climate change and called for politicians and other adults to take science on the issue seriously.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 7, 2019