Social media

Senate report shows extent of Russia's 2016 disinformation campaign

Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

A report authored for the Senate Intelligence Committee and obtained by the Washington Post highlights the scale of Russia's disinformation campaign during the 2016 election cycle to aid Donald Trump’s White House bid.

Why it matters: The report — from Oxford University’s Computational Propaganda Project and network analysis firm Graphika — illustrates how Russian agents targeted almost every major social media platform, including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to influence online discourse both in support of Trump’s candidacy and "to confuse, distract and ultimately discourage members [of Trump's main opposition groups] from voting." Senate Intel plans to release the report with another study later this week, but hasn't yet indicated if it will endorse the report's findings.

Teens in study say social media makes them feel good

teenagers taking a selfie
A group of teenagers take a selfie in Times Square, New York CIty. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Despite rising concern in both Silicon Valley and beyond about screen time overload, a new Pew Research Center report shows a large majority of teenagers believe using social media is good for them.

Why it matters: A lot of research into the relationship between young people and social media has drawn negative conclusions: social media is anxiety-inducing, creates unrealistic body images, and promotes cyberbullying and ideological bubbles, BuzzFeed reports. But teens themselves apparently disagree.

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