Jul 3, 2023 - News

North Carolina's newest laws

Animated illustration of a gavel replacing the pendulum inside a grandfather clock.

Illustration: Maura Losch/Axios

Dozens of changes to state law took effect Saturday, including one of the most controversial and impactful measures in recent years: new restrictions — and exceptions — for abortions.

Driving the news: North Carolina's Republican-controlled legislature has sent more than 40 bills to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's desk so far this session. So far, all but two have become law.

Why it matters: Some legislation that became law Saturday, like the state's new 12-week abortion limits and consultation requirements for those seeking their procedures, have been front and center since their passage, while others, though still important, have flown under the radar.

Also among the new laws in effect:

Guns: Removal of pistol purchase requirements issued by sheriffs — which means those who buy pistols through private sellers will not longer be vetted.

  • Anyone guilty of domestic violence will also now be charged with a misdemeanor, closing a loophole some worried the repeal of pistol purchase permits would make it easier for domestic abusers to buy guns.
  • Some people are also now allowed to carry guns in churches attached to schools when school is not in session.

Opioid overdoses: New allowances for government agencies or anyone who has obtained naloxone over the counter as well as via prescription to administer it to anyone at risk of experiencing an overdose or experiencing one.

A ban on shark fishing tournaments during tourist season on the shores of Carolina Beach, Caswell Beach, Holden Beach, Kure Beach, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Sunset Beach and Bald Head Island.

Under the new abortion law:

  • State employees and teachers who give birth are now guaranteed eight weeks of paid parental leave, and partners or adoptive parents will receive four weeks.
  • Repeat, violent sex offenders could be subject to lifetime GPS monitoring.
  • Foster care families will receive increased payments per child.
  • Certified nurse midwives, who serve as primary care providers and manage low-risk pregnancies and births, would be granted the ability to practice independently without physician oversight, as numerous other states allow.:
  • State employees and teachers who give birth are now guaranteed eight weeks of paid parental leave, and partners or adoptive parents will receive four weeks.
  • Repeat, violent sex offenders could be subject to lifetime GPS monitoring.
  • Foster care families will receive increased payments per child.
  • Certified nurse midwives, who serve as primary care providers and manage low-risk pregnancies and births, would be granted the ability to practice independently without physician oversight, as numerous other states allow.

In Raleigh:

  • Owners of wild animals — like lions, tigers, wolves, monkeys, hybrids or crossbreeds and medically significant venomous snakes — are now required to register the animal through the city.
  • Parking fees are now higher in certain parts of Glenwood South, like crosswalks, no parking areas and residential spaces.
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