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An anti-government demonstration on Oct. 26 in Turin, Italy, against the economic consequences of new restrictions. Luxury stores in the city were "ransacked," the Guardian notes. Photo: Diego Puletto/Getty Images

Protests in Italy against fresh COVID-19 pandemic restrictions that came into effect Monday descended into violence in Milan and and Turin, where police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, per the Guardian.

The big picture: The protests in Italian cities still reeling from the first lockdown mark some of the biggest resistance against measures seen yet as restrictions return across Europe, which is facing a second coronavirus wave. Here's what's been happening in cities across the continent, in photos.

Italy
Peaceful demonstrators in Naples on Oct. 26 protest restrictions that have seen gyms, movie theaters and pools close and bars and restaurants required to shut by 6 p.m. until at least Nov. 24. Photo: Ivan Romano/Getty Images
Czech Republic
An outdoor mass at the Old Town Square in Prague on Oct. 26. The government is introducing new restrictions, including a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew, effective Oct. 28 through Nov. 3. Photo: Michal Cizek/AFP via Getty Images
France
Pedestrians walk along an empty street on Oct. 25 in Cannes, on the French Riviera, as France reported a record 52,010 new cases. The government extended a nightly curfew to 38 more departments for at least six weeks. Photo: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
A bar owner closes up before the citywide 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew comes into effect on Oct. 17 in Paris. France surpassed 1 million COVID-19 cases on Oct. 22. Photo: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images
United Kingdom
A quiet street in the usually bustling Welsh capital Cardiff on Oct. 25 — a day after Wales entered a 17-day "firebreak" lockdown during which all nonessential businesses must shut and people are required to stay home, with few exceptions. Photo: Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images
A bar in Manchester, northwest England, on Oct. 8, 2020. The city was placed on the highest lockdown level of England's three-tier system against the wishes of local officials on Oct. 23. Photo: Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images
A pub in Edinburgh on Oct. 7. Bars and restaurants across Scotland's central belt, including Edinburgh and Glasgow, have had to close at 6 p.m. nightly since Oct. 9. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has announced a five-level restrictions system, effective Nov. 2. Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Spain
A street on the first night of a nationwide 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew in Madrid on Oct. 25. The government also declared a state of emergency. Spain exceeded 1 million coronavirus infections on Oct. 21. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
A park on Oct. 16 in Barcelona as restrictions including measures requiring children's play areas to close at 8 p.m. and restaurants and bars restricted to providing takeout or delivery only take effect. Photo: David Zorrakino/Europa Press via Getty Images
Germany
An inn in Bavaria on Oct. 17. Half of the state's districts and cities have restrictions including on closing hours. Chancellor Angela Merkel announced on Oct. 15 new measures such as a curfews for restaurants and bars in coronavirus hot spots. Photo: Angelika Warmuth/Picture Allliance via Getty Images
Ireland
A pub in Dublin on Oct. 19. Under Ireland's six-week-long measures, which took effect at midnight on Oct. 21, most stores must close, home visits are banned and a three-mile travel limit has been imposed for exercise. Photo: Paul Faith/AFP via Getty Images
Romania
Romanian Christian-Orthodox followers worship the relics of Saint Dimitrie Basarabov at Patriarchal Cathedral in Bucharest Oct. 25 after undergoing identity checks and facing requirements including masks and disinfectant. Schools in the city switched to online lessons only on Oct. 20. Photo: Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images
Denmark
Students do their math in a forest on Sept. 7 in Samsø. More Danish schools are turning to outdoor schooling, as the country braces for further restrictions. From Oct. 29, face masks will become mandatory in indoor public places, gatherings will be limited to 10 people and alcohol sales will be prohibited after 10 p.m., per The Local DK. Photo: Maja Hitij/Getty Images
Belgium
Ghent on Oct. 17, where restaurants and bars have been closing at 11pm, among other measures. Prime Minister Alexander De Croo said these venues must shut completely for one month from Oct. 19. Photo: Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images
The Netherlands
A closed bar in Eindhoven in the Netherlands on Oct. 17, where the catering industry has been ordered to remain shut for at least four weeks. Photo: Rob Engelaar/ANP/AFP via Getty Images
Poland
The UNESCO Main Square in Krakow, Poland, on Oct. 17, as new measures come into effect across the country — such as restricted opening hours for restaurants, events reduced to 25% attendance, and gyms and swimming pools closed. Photo: Omar Marques/Getty Images

Go deeper: Europe braces for monster 2nd coronavirus wave

Editor's note: This article has been updated to include further details of the pandemic in Europe, including new measures.

Go deeper

11 hours ago - Health

Fauci: COVID-19 hotspots have materialized across "the entire country"

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Graeme Jennings/AFP via Getty Images

The United States is "seeing hotspots literally throughout the entire country," with a countrywide average of 70,000 COVID-19 cases per day, NIAID director Anthony Fauci told the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's annual forum Friday.

Driving the news: The U.S. hit another grim milestone on Friday, with the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases surpassing 9 million as new infections surge across the country, per data from Johns Hopkins University.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
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16 hours ago - Health

CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order"

The Pacific Princess cruise ship is shown docked at the Port of Los Angeles. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday it's replacing its "no-sail" order on U.S. cruises with a less restrictive "Conditional Sailing Order," setting the stage for the phased resumption of passenger cruise line travel.

Why it matters: Cruise ships were the sites of some of the most severe coronavirus outbreaks early in the pandemic, before the industry shut down in March.

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