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A waiter stands on an empty street in downtown Lisbon on Nov. 9, after Portugal introduced a night-time curfew for 70% of the population, including the capital and also the coastal city of Porto. It'll last for at least two weeks, per the BBC. Photo: Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

Portugal and Hungary have become the latest European countries to impose partial lockdowns, with curfews going into effect overnight. Governments across the continent are imposing more restrictions in attempts to curb COVID-19 spikes.

The big picture: Over 9.2 million cases have been reported to the European Centre for Disease Control. Per the ECDC, France has the most (almost 1.8 million) followed by Spain (over 1.3 million) and the United Kingdom (nearly 1.2 million). The COVID death rate per 100,000 of the population is highest in the Czech Republic (25), followed by Belgium (19) and Hungary (10.4).

Hungary
A UEFA Champions League game between Ferencvaros Budapest and Juventus at Groupama Arena in Budapest on Nov. 4. Hungary's eateries and educational institutions closed Nov. 9 for at least a month. It also started its existing curfew earlier — now running from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. Photo: Laszlo Szirtesi/Getty Images
United Kingdom
The usually bustling Old Bond Street on Nov. 9, in London, England, which has been under a nationwide lockdown since Nov. 5. It's due to end Dec. 2, but officials have said it may be extended, the Telegraph reports. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
A street in central Edinburgh city, Scotland, which is using a five-level restrictions system since Nov. 2 for regions that's reviewed weekly, the BBC notes. Photo: Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images
A hair salon in Cardiff on Nov. 9, as Wales emerges from a 17-day "firebreak" lockdown during which most people were required to stay home and all nonessential businesses closed. Photo: Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images
Italy
The Piazza Duomo in Milan, Lombardy, on Nov. 6, the first day of the new regional lockdown that has seen a regional travel ban imposed and bars and restaurants shut. Photo: Alessandro Bremec/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Peaceful demonstrators in Naples on Oct. 26 to protest restrictions that have seen gyms, movie theaters and pools close and bars and restaurants required to shut by 6 p.m. until at least Nov. 24. There was unrest in other cities, such as Turin where luxury stores were "ransacked," per the Guardian. Photo: Ivan Romano/Getty Images
Austria
A teenager in a basketball cage in Vienna on Nov. 9, during the new lockdown that began Nov. 3, which has seen a night-time curfew imposed, while cafes, bars and restaurants will remain shut until the end of November. Photo: Georg Hochmuth/APA/AFP via Getty Images
Germany
Staff at a closed restaurant in Cologne's old town on Nov. 2, after Chancellor Angela Merkel announced new restrictions, including "a ban on overnight tourism stays," effective immediately, until the end of the month," Politico reports. Photo: Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images
An inn in Bavaria on Oct. 17. Half of the state's districts and cities have restrictions including on closing hours. Merkel announced on Oct. 15 measures such as a curfews for restaurants and bars in coronavirus hot spots. Photo: Angelika Warmuth/Picture Allliance via Getty Images
France
Pedestrians walk along an empty street on Oct. 25 in Cannes, on the French Riviera, as France reported a record 52,010 new cases. The government extended a nightly curfew to 38 more departments for at least six weeks. Photo: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
A bar owner closes up before the citywide 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew comes into effect on Oct. 17 in Paris. France surpassed 1 million COVID-19 cases on Oct. 22. Photo: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images
Spain
Firefighters extinguish a fire during a Nov,. 1 protest in Madrid against the government's state of emergency and regional restrictions, which health officials said they hope to lift by the month's end, El País reports. Photo: Burak Akbulut/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
A street on the first night of a nationwide 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew in Madrid on Oct. 25. Spain surpassed 1 million coronavirus infections on Oct. 21. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
A park on Oct. 16 in Barcelona as restrictions including measures requiring children's play areas to close at 8 p.m. and restaurants and bars restricted to providing takeout or delivery only take effect. Photo: David Zorrakino/Europa Press via Getty Images
Sweden
A physical distancing sign at a Stockholm station in Nov. 4, a day after Sweden announced people in 21 regions must avoid physical contact with those outside their households until the end of November. Other measures include limiting the number of people sitting together in venues to eight. Photo: Anders Wiklund/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Images
Ireland
A pub in Dublin on Oct. 19. Under Ireland's six-week-long measures, which took effect at midnight on Oct. 21, most stores must close, home visits are banned and a three-mile travel limit has been imposed for exercise. Photo: Paul Faith/AFP via Getty Images
Romania
Romanian Christian-Orthodox followers worship the relics of Saint Dimitrie Basarabov at Patriarchal Cathedral in Bucharest Oct. 25 after undergoing identity checks and facing requirements including masks and disinfectant. Schools in the city switched to online lessons only on Oct. 20. Photo: Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images
Denmark
Students do their math in a forest on Sept. 7 in Samsø. More Danish schools are turning to outdoor schooling, as the country braces for further restrictions. From Oct. 29, face masks will become mandatory in indoor public places, gatherings will be limited to 10 people and alcohol sales will be prohibited after 10 p.m., per The Local DK. Photo: Maja Hitij/Getty Images
Belgium
Ghent on Oct. 17, where restaurants and bars have been closing at 11pm, among other measures. Prime Minister Alexander De Croo said these venues must shut completely for one month from Oct. 19. The government has since imposed a strict lockdown, starting Nov. 1. Photo: Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Greece
Tourists walk past a cafe in Athens on Nov. 2, as Greece announced new measures such as closing bars, restaurants, cinemas, museums and gyms in red zones, including in the capital. Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP via Getty Images
Czech Republic
An outdoor mass at the Old Town Square in Prague on Oct. 26. The government is introducing new restrictions, including a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew, effective Oct. 28 through Nov. 3. Photo: Michal Cizek/AFP via Getty Images
The Netherlands
A closed bar in Eindhoven in the Netherlands on Oct. 17, where the catering industry has been ordered to remain shut for at least four weeks. Photo: Rob Engelaar/ANP/AFP via Getty Images
Poland
The UNESCO Main Square in Krakow, Poland, on Oct. 17, as new measures come into effect across the country — such as restricted opening hours for restaurants, events reduced to 25% attendance, and gyms and swimming pools closed. Photo: Omar Marques/Getty Images

Go deeper: Europe's grim lesson about COVID lockdowns

Editor's note: This article has been updated to include further details of the pandemic in Europe, including new measures.

Go deeper

Jan 30, 2021 - World

Science helps New Zealand avoid another coronavirus lockdown

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern (L) visits a lab at Auckland University in December. Photo: Phil Walter/Getty Images

New Zealand has avoided locking down for a second time over COVID-19 community cases because of a swift, science-led response.

Why it matters: The Health Ministry said in an email to Axios Friday there's "no evidence of community transmission" despite three people testing positive after leaving managed hotel isolation. That means Kiwis can continue to visit bars, restaurants and events as much of the world remains on lockdown.

Jan 29, 2021 - Health

NYC set to restart indoor dining in February, weddings in March

Outdoor dining in New York City in January. Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that if the current coronavirus positivity in New York City holds, indoor dining will reopen at 25% capacity on Feb. 14, one of the busiest dining days of the year.

Why it matters: The forced closure of indoor dining in December caused major backlash, as New York's struggling restaurant industry had already been hit hard by pandemic restrictions. Restaurants will still be required to close at 1o p.m.

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