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Photo: Gabriel Bouts/AFP via Getty Image

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez on Sunday announced a new state of emergency that imposes a curfew in an effort to combat a rising number of coronavirus cases.

Driving the news: The mandate comes less than a week after Spain became the first nation in Western Europe to exceed 1 million COVID-19 cases.

Details: The 11pm to 6am curfew will begin Sunday night local time and will likely last for six months, Sanchez said.

  • The curfew allows for exceptions for those going to work, buying medicine, and taking care of elderly and young family members.
  • Authorities from Spain’s 17 regions and two autonomous cities can set their own rules as long as they are stricter than the national mandate, AP reports.
  • Sanchez said he will ask the Parliament’s lower house to extend the state of emergency until May, though it could be lifted earlier if conditions improve. A state of emergency can last no longer than two weeks, unless endorsed by the Congress of Deputies, per AP.

What they're saying: “The reality is that Europe and Spain are immersed in a second wave of the pandemic,” Sanchez said during a nationwide address.

  • “The situation we are living in is extreme,” he added.
  • Sanchez also noted that this mandate is less restrictive than the first one declared in March. “There is no home confinement in this state of emergency, but the more we stay at home, the safer we will be. Everyone knows what they have to do,” he said.

The big picture: Restrictions are returning across Europe as the continent faces a new wave of coronavirus infections.

  • French President Emmanuel Macron recently declared a state of health emergency and instated a curfew on some of the regions that have been hardest hit by the coronavirus.

Go deeper: In photos: Coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

Go deeper

20 hours ago - Health

WH coronavirus task force: States must "flatten the curve" to sustain health system

A walk-up Covid-19 testing site in San Fernando, California, on Nov. 24, ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday.

The White House coronavirus task force warned states "the COVID risk to all Americans is at a historic high" and to brace for another surge following Thanksgiving, per a report that emerged Wednesday.

Driving the news: "If you are under 40, you need to assume you became infected during the Thanksgiving period if you gathered beyond your immediate household," said the report, dated Nov. 29, first published by the Center for Public Integrity.

18 hours ago - Health

Obama, Bush and Clinton willing to take coronavirus vaccine in public

Former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, New Jersey, in 2017. Photo: Rob Carr/Getty Images

Barack Obama said during an interview on SiriusXM airing Thursday he'll take the COVID-19 vaccine and "may end up taking it on TV." Representatives for George W. Bush and Bill Clinton told CNN they'd also be willing to be inoculated in public.

Why it matters: The former presidents are hoping to instill confidence in the vaccines once authorized for use in the U.S. NIAID director Anthony Fauci has said the U.S. could have herd immunity by the end of next summer or fall if enough people get vaccinated.

Bipartisan group of lawmakers unveils $908 billion COVID stimulus proposal

Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) in the Capitol in 2018. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Tuesday proposed a $908 billion coronavirus stimulus package, in one of the few concrete steps toward COVID relief made by Congress in several months.

Why it matters: Recent data shows that the economic recovery is floundering as coronavirus cases surge and hospitals threaten to be overwhelmed heading into what is likely to be a grim winter.