Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Trump and Zelensky shake hands during a meeting in New York in September. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

In six months, a phone call between President Trump and Ukraine's president escalated into a full-blown crisis that is culminating in Trump's impeachment.

What's next: Assuming the House approves articles of impeachment later tonight, Trump will face a trial in the Senate next month — which is likely to end in his acquittal, since Senate Republicans have already been openly dismissive about the merits of the case against him.

How we got here:

  • July 18: State Department and Pentagon are informed Trump is withholding $392 million in military aid to Ukraine, but not told why.
  • July 25 phone call: Trump asks Ukraine's new president, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden — Trump's potential 2020 election rival — and his son Hunter. That request is not made public to Americans.
  • Aug. 12: A whistleblower, who works inside the U.S. intelligence community, files a complaint alleging that Trump used "the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 election."
  • Sept. 11: The administration quietly lifts the hold on aid to Ukraine under pressure from lawmakers including Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), but without public explanation.
  • Sept. 24: Pelosi announces a formal impeachment inquiry.
  • Sept. 25: White House releases a partial transcript of the July 25 call, hours before Trump and Zelensky meet face to face at the UN General Assembly.
    • Zelensky says he didn't feel pressured during the call.
  • Sept. 26: The whistleblower complaint is released.
  • Oct. 3–Nov. 16: Current and former Trump administration officials with knowledge of Trump's Ukraine activity are grilled behind closed doors by members of the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees.
  • Nov. 13–21: Current and former Trump administration officials testify publicly before the House Intelligence Committee.
  • Dec. 4: Legal experts testify before the House Judiciary Committee on the constitutional basis for and against the impeachment of Trump.
  • Dec. 9: The House Judiciary Committee hears the evidence behind the impeachment.
  • Dec. 13: The House Judiciary Committee approves articles of impeachment against Trump.
  • Dec. 18: The full House of Representatives debates and votes on the articles of impeachment.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Wall Street braces for more turbulence ahead of Election Day

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Wall Street is digging in for a potentially rocky period as Election Day gets closer.

Why it matters: Investors are facing a "three-headed monster," Brian Belski, chief investment strategist at BMO Capital Markets, tells Axios — a worsening pandemic, an economic stimulus package in limbo, and an imminent election.

Dave Lawler, author of World
3 hours ago - World

How Biden might tackle the Iran deal

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Four more years of President Trump would almost certainly kill the Iran nuclear deal — but the election of Joe Biden wouldn’t necessarily save it.

The big picture: Rescuing the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) is near the top of Biden's foreign policy priority list. He says he'd re-enter the deal once Iran returns to compliance, and use it as the basis on which to negotiate a broader and longer-lasting deal with Iran.

Kamala Harris, the new left's insider

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images     

Progressive leaders see Sen. Kamala Harris, if she's elected vice president, as their conduit to a post-Biden Democratic Party where the power will be in younger, more diverse and more liberal hands.

  • Why it matters: The party's rising left sees Harris as the best hope for penetrating Joe Biden's older, largely white inner circle.

If Biden wins, Harris will become the first woman, first Black American and first Indian American to serve as a U.S. vice president — and would instantly be seen as the first in line for the presidency should Biden decide against seeking a second term.