Photo: Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler signaled at today's televised hearing that the committee is broadening the scope of the impeachment inquiry to include Robert Mueller's findings.

Driving the news ... Democrats displayed three impeachable offenses on the screens in the room: Abuse of power and bribery, obstruction of Congress, and obstruction of justice.

Why it matters: This is the clearest sign yet that these could be the articles of impeachment ultimately drafted by the committee.

The big picture: Outside of a few tense exchanges, the hearing hasn't had the fire of the pre-Thanksgiving witnesses.

  • Some Republicans looked bored throughout the hearing.
  • Lawmakers' questions, as in the case of Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.), were often to cast doubt on witnesses' credibility with insinuations about their partisan motives. [Updated]

Today's agenda: Legal professors walked the panel through whether the evidence gathered in the impeachment inquiry so far meets the historical definition of impeachment.

The Democratic witnesses:

  • Stanford law professor Pamela Karlan: "Everything I know ... tells me that when President Trump invited — indeed, demanded — foreign involvement in our upcoming election, he struck at the very heart of what makes this country the 'republic' to which we pledge allegiance."
  • Harvard law professor Noah Feldman: "President Trump has committed impeachable high crimes and misdemeanors by corruptly abusing the office of the presidency."
  • UNC-Chapel Hill law professor Michael Gerhardt: "The president’s serious misconduct ... are worse than the misconduct of any prior president."

The Republican witness:

  • George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley: "[O]ne can oppose President Trump’s policies or actions but still conclude that the current legal case for impeachment is not just woefully inadequate, but in some respects, dangerous."

Watch:

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
4 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.

Biden to Trump: "I have not taken a penny from any foreign source ever in my life"

Former VP Joe Biden pushed back Thursday against allegations from President Trump, saying he had never profited from foreign sources. "Nothing was unethical," Biden told debate moderator Kristen Welker about his son Hunter's work in Ukraine while he was vice president.

Why it matters: Earlier on Thursday, Hunter Biden's former business partner, Tony Bobulinski, released a statement saying Joe Biden's claims that he never discussed overseas business dealings with his son were "false."

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