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Stanford law professor Pamela Karlan, one of the legal scholars called by Democrats to testify in the House Judiciary Committee's first impeachment hearing on Wednesday, hit back at ranking member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) for suggesting that she is a partisan who doesn't care about the "facts" of the case against President Trump.

"Everything I know about our Constitution and its values, and my review of the evidentiary record — and here Mr. Collins, I would like to say to you sir, that I read transcripts of every one of the witnesses who appeared in the live hearing, because I would not speak about these things without reviewing the facts. So I'm insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don't care about the facts. But everything I read on those occasions tells me that when President Trump invited, indeed demanded, foreign involvement in our upcoming election, he struck at the very heart of what makes this a republic to which we pledge allegiance."
— Pamela Karlan

The big picture: In his opening statement, Collins complained that the committee's first hearing had not called any fact witnesses and was relying on constitutional scholars called by Democrats to discuss the basis for impeachment. Karlan has been criticized by Republicans for having a bias against Trump, but she rejected that argument by citing the "evidentiary record" before the committee, which she said shows that the president solicited foreign election interference for his own political gain.

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The Week America Changed

Sandberg thought Zuckerberg was "nuts" on remote work in January 2020

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Image

Chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg thought Mark Zuckerberg was "nuts" when he raised the possibility in January 2020 that 50,000 Facebook employees might have to work from home. By March 6, they were.

Why it matters: In an interview Monday with Axios Re:Cap, Sandberg explained how Facebook moved quickly to respond to the pandemic with grants for small businesses and work-from-home stipends for its employees, and how the company has been watching the unfolding crisis for women in the workforce.

Supreme Court declines to hear case on qualified immunity for police officers

The Supreme Court on March 5. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal for a lawsuit brought against Cleveland police officers that challenges the scope of qualified immunity, the legal doctrine which has been used to shield officers from lawsuits alleging excessive force, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: The doctrine has been the subject of scrutiny from civil rights advocates. Eliminating qualified immunity was one of the key demands of demonstrators during nationwide protests in 2020 following the killing of George Floyd.