Dec 4, 2019

"I'm insulted": Stanford law witness rebukes Collins in opening statement

Stanford law professor Pamela Karlan, one of the legal scholars called by Democrats to testify in the House Judiciary Committee's first impeachment hearing on Wednesday, hit back at ranking member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) for suggesting that she is a partisan who doesn't care about the "facts" of the case against President Trump.

"Everything I know about our Constitution and its values, and my review of the evidentiary record — and here Mr. Collins, I would like to say to you sir, that I read transcripts of every one of the witnesses who appeared in the live hearing, because I would not speak about these things without reviewing the facts. So I'm insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don't care about the facts. But everything I read on those occasions tells me that when President Trump invited, indeed demanded, foreign involvement in our upcoming election, he struck at the very heart of what makes this a republic to which we pledge allegiance."
— Pamela Karlan

The big picture: In his opening statement, Collins complained that the committee's first hearing had not called any fact witnesses and was relying on constitutional scholars called by Democrats to discuss the basis for impeachment. Karlan has been criticized by Republicans for having a bias against Trump, but she rejected that argument by citing the "evidentiary record" before the committee, which she said shows that the president solicited foreign election interference for his own political gain.

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Updated 59 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Minneapolis police block protesters at a rally on May 30 outside the state house on the fourth straight day of demonstrations against the death of George Floyd. Photo: Megan Jelinger/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Police fired tear gas during a fourth straight night of protests in Minneapolis, video from the scene shows, as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the U.S. Saturday.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

U.S. cities crack down on protests against police brutality

Demonstrators gather at Lafayette Park across from the White House to protest the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Trump to invite Russia and other non-member G7 countries to summit

President Trump at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Saul Martinez/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Saturday evening he would postpone the G7 summit to September and expand the meeting to more nations that are not members of the Group of 7.

Details: Trump said he would invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to the summit, according to a pool report. "I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries," he said.