South Korea’s military detected an "unidentified object" flying near its border with North Korea Monday, AP reports, as North Korean state media hailed the "amazing" historic meeting between President Trump and its leader Kim Jong-un a day earlier.

Why it matters: While South Korea's military was unable to immediately identify the object at the Demilitarized Zone that separates the 2 Koreas, the incident is a reminder of the tensions at the DMZ. Hours earlier, North Korea's state-run KCNA news agency said Trump and Kim had agreed to proceed with talks on the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

"The top leaders of the two countries agreed to keep in close touch in the future, too, and resume and push forward productive dialogues for making a new breakthrough in the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and in the bilateral relations."
— KCNA

The big picture: Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to step inside North Korea, where he shook hands with Kim. The meeting occurred after Trump tweeted an invitation to Kim some 36 hours earlier. South Korean President Moon Jae-in attended a meeting with Trump and Kim on South Korea's side of the border.

  • Though the meeting occurred at a time of heightened tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, Trump said he'd "feel very comfortable" crossing the border to meet with Kim.
  • Trump's Vietnam summit with Kim earlier this year ended without any tangible progress on denuclearization.

Go deeper: In photos: Trump and Kim hold historic meeting

Go deeper

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The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.

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Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

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Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.