A protest outside the governor's mansion in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan. 20. The sign in the center reads: "The goverment wants us dead, while they hide what is ours." Photo: Jose Jimenez/Getty Images

Hundreds of protesters rallied outside Puerto Rico's Capitol building and the governor's coastal mansion Monday evening to demand the U.S. territory's leader resign over unused aid, as earthquakes continue to rock the island, AP reports.

Why it matters: In her first major crisis since becoming governor last August, Gov. Wanda Vázquez fired three top officials over a viral video showing a government warehouse full of unused disaster relief aid dating back to Hurricane Maria in 2017.

  • In scenes reminiscent of the start of last summer's demonstrations that led to the resignation of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, protesters again declared they would "remain in the streets until Vázquez also steps down," AP notes.
  • Hundreds of people remain homeless in the quake-ravaged southern city of Ponce, where the video was filmed last Saturday, per NPR.

Video details: The livestream by activist Lorenzo Delgado shows cases of unwrapped bottled water, generators, blankets, diapers, baby formula and wipes. Boxes of ready meals can be seen, along with signs stating: "FEMA, Not For Resale."

What they're saying: Vázquez told a news conference Sunday the National Guard would help in the disaster response and she has "ordered a complete inventory of what supplies remained in warehouses as well as their expiration dates," BuzzFeed reports.

  • A National Guard spokesperson said late Monday its service members "had delivered some of the unused warehouse supplies to 10 municipalities outside of the main quake zone that had not previously received much aid, despite being affected by the temblors," according to the New York Times.


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Texas and Louisiana face fresh flood threat from Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical Storm Beta slowly approaching the Texas coast on Monday. Photo: National Weather Service/Twitter

Tropical Storm Beta was dumping heavy rains over Texas as it churned its way inland overnight, bringing the risk of "life-threatening storm surge" and flooding to parts of the state and Louisiana, the National Hurricane Center said.

What's happening: The slow-moving storm was causing coastal flooding along areas including the bays near Houston and Galveston in Texas Monday, per the National Weather Service. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) made a disaster declaration and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 31,328,238 — Total deaths: 964,839— Total recoveries: 21,503,496Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,857,967 — Total deaths: 199,884 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

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