Nov 6, 2017

100,000 Puerto Ricans have left the island since Maria hit

A woman, left homeless after the hurricane, uses her cell phone in a shelter that doesn't have electricity — like much of the island. Photo: Ramon Espinosa / AP

As of Sunday, 46 days after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, most of the island is still without power and more than 100,000 Puerto Ricans have left for the continental U.S., CBS's "60 Minutes" reports. Gov. Ricardo Rosselló says many more will follow suit if the situation remains dire. Many won't return.

"Our only transaction to go to the United States is buying an airplane ticket. That's it. You don't even need a passport. So if conditions are so dire here the U.S. citizens here are gonna go to where they can get equal conditions. Now is that something that the United States wants?" Rosselló said.

Go deeper: Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, by the numbers

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Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 5 hours ago - Health

Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.