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Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence said on Tuesday that he will not invoke the 25th Amendment t0 remove President Trump from office because it would "set a terrible precedent."

Why it matters: Although Pence's announcement was expected, it paves the way for House Democrats to move forward with impeachment legislation.

What he's saying: In a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Pence said, "I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with our Constitution."

  • He urged Pelosi and "every member of Congress to avoid actions that would further divide and inflame the passions of the moment," in reference to last week's deadly U.S. Capitol riots.

For the record: House Democrats on Monday introduced a single article of impeachment against Trump, accusing him of inciting a mob of his supporters to violence to prevent certifying the election of President-elect Joe Biden.

  • Soon after Pence's announcement, Pelosi named Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and eight other representatives as managers of the impeachment trial of Trump.

Read Pence's letter, via DocumentCloud:

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Sanders says Democrats will push coronavirus relief package through with simple majority

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) leaves the Senate floor on Jan. 1. Photo: Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), incoming chair of the Senate Budget Committee who caucuses with the Democrats, told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday that Democrats plan to push a coronavirus relief package through the chamber with a simple majority vote.

Why it matters: "Budget reconciliation" would allow Democrats to forgo the Senate's 60-vote requirement and could potentially speed-up the next relief package for millions of unemployed Americans. Democrats hold the the 50-50 split in the Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote.

24 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.