Jul 21, 2022 - News

Dallas-area woman's miscarriage complicated after Texas abortion ban

Illustration of two tears of paper with fingers pointing in opposite directions and a woman holding her hands in the middle
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A 35-year-old woman from the Dallas area had two miscarriages within a year and had a vastly different experience after the state's abortion ban went into effect last fall.

  • She shared her story with the New York Times, which detailed the ordeal on "The Daily" podcast.

Why it matters: Restrictive abortion laws may be scaring doctors away from performing procedures for anyone experiencing a miscarriage.

  • There's little difference between those procedures and the methods used to perform abortions, blurring the lines for doctors who may fear legal reprisal.

What happened: The North Texas woman and her husband were overjoyed when she became pregnant, but they learned there was no longer a heartbeat during a routine ultrasound at the 10-week mark.

  • She underwent dilation and curettage, or D&C, to remove the pregnancy tissue from her uterus per her doctor's recommendation.

But, but, but: When Amanda had another miscarriage about eight months later, she was denied a D&C at the same hospital.

  • She was told to go home and only return if she bled enough in an hour to fill a diaper.
  • The couple went home and Amanda sat in a warm bath to try to soothe the cramping. The water turned red.
  • Amanda passed clots and bled heavily for 48 hours. She eventually passed all the pregnancy tissue but continued to bleed for a week.
  • The hospital declined to say whether the law played a role in denying the treatment.

What they're saying: "It was so different from my first experience where they were so nice and so comforting," the woman told the Times.

Flashback: Texas' law that bans abortions after six weeks, including in cases of rape and incest, went into effect in September.

  • And it awards $10,000 to people who sue anyone suspected of helping someone get the procedure.
  • Now that Roe has been overturned, a trigger law will go into effect that makes performing an abortion a felony.

What's next: Amanda no longer wants to conceive in Texas.

  • "We don't feel like it's safe in Texas to continue to try after what we went through," she told the Times.
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