Jan 2, 2024 - News

5 events that will rule 2024 in Cleveland

Illustration of "2024" written on four sheets of paper on a corkboard.

Illustration: Lindsey Bailey/Axios

2024 is shaping up to be an eventful year in Cleveland.

Why it matters: The city will host a handful of events intended to draw national and global attention:

🏀 Women's Final Four

When: April 5 and 7

The intrigue: Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse hosts this year's NCAA Women's Final Four, which follows a 2023 Final Four that was the most-viewed in the event's history.

  • This year's Final Four could feature major college stars like Iowa's Caitlin Clark, LSU's Angel Reese and UConn's Paige Bueckers.

🌑 Total solar eclipse

When: April 8

The intrigue: One day after the Final Four, Cleveland will find itself in the full path of a total solar eclipse for the first time in more than 200 years.

🥇 Pan-American Masters Games

When: July 12-21

The intrigue: The global, multisport event will draw 10,000 athletes plus thousands more fans to Greater Cleveland.

  • Not only will it be the biggest international event in Cleveland history, according to organizers, but also generate $25 million in economic impact.
Eminem and LL Cool J perform on stage together.
Eminem and LL Cool J perform at a Rock Hall ceremony. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

ğŸŽ¸ Rock Hall inductions

When: Fall

The intrigue: The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductions return to Cleveland for the first time since 2021, bringing major musicians back here on a yet-to-be-determined date this fall, likely the first weekend in November.

  • The ceremony streamed live on Disney+ in 2023. You can expect the museum to put together a week's worth of festivities in the lead-up.

🗳️ Election Day

When: Nov. 5

The intrigue: If you thought last November's election — with abortion rights and marijuana legalization on the ballot — was intense, 2024 features what is expected to be a wild general election.

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