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A horse-drawn carriage carrying the body of the late Rep. John Lewis on July 26 crosses the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, where Lewis and other civil rights leaders were attacked by police officers while marching in support of voting rights. Photo: Lynsey Weatherspoon/Getty Images

The life of the late Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) is being celebrated in a series of memorials this weekend across Alabama, the state in which he was born.

The big picture: Six days of remembrance for the giant of the civil rights movement, who died on July 17 at age 80, began Saturday morning with a service celebrating "The Boy from Troy" at Trojan Arena, Troy University, per a schedule provided by his family.

  • On Sunday, Lewis was transported across the famous Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, where the civil rights icon was brutally beaten by police officers while leading a march for voting rights in 1965, for the final time.
  • Following this weekend's ceremonies, Lewis' body will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol for a week, starting Monday.
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey places a wreath at the casket of Lewis in the state Capitol building where he was to lie in state on July 26, 2020 in Montgomery. Photo: Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via Getty Images
The carriage carrying Lewis' body prepares to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The day of the march Lewis helped lead there became known as "Bloody Sunday." Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
"​The Boy from Troy"​ service for the late Rep. John Lewis July 25 in Troy, Alabama. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
A girl reads a program during the Trojan Arena service on July 25, after which Lewis' body lay in repose before being taken to Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma, Alabama, in the evening. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
People listen to speakers at the July 25 Trojan Arena service, which observed physical distancing because of the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
The family of Lewis watch pallbearers prepare to bring his casket into Brown Chapel A.ME. Church, where he lay in repose on the night of July 25. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
Military pallbearers take the casket of Lewis out of a hearse as they prepare to carry him into Brown Chapel A.ME. Church for the private service on July 25. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

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Editor's note: This article will be updated throughout the week as ceremonies for Lewis are held. Please check back for updates.

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Updated Nov 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Trump and Biden make final push for voters on election eve

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and President Trump at his campaign event in Traverse City, Michigan, on Nov. 2.

President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's contrasting styles and attitudes toward the coronavirus pandemic were starkly evident on their final day of campaigning before the election.

The big picture: Trump held packed rallies as he criss-crossed states, with events in North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin on Monday. Biden's campaign focused on Ohio and Pennsylvania, seen as crucial to the election. His campaigning has been notable for precautions against COVID-19, such as holding drive-in rallies.

Updated Nov 10, 2020 - World

In photos: Coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

A waiter stands on an empty street in downtown Lisbon on Nov. 9, after Portugal introduced a night-time curfew for 70% of the population, including the capital and also the coastal city of Porto. It'll last for at least two weeks, per the BBC. Photo: Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

Portugal and Hungary have become the latest European countries to impose partial lockdowns, with curfews going into effect overnight. Governments across the continent are imposing more restrictions in attempts to curb COVID-19 spikes.

The big picture: Over 9.2 million cases have been reported to the European Centre for Disease Control. Per the ECDC, France has the most (almost 1.8 million) followed by Spain (over 1.3 million) and the United Kingdom (nearly 1.2 million). The COVID death rate per 100,000 of the population is highest in the Czech Republic (25), followed by Belgium (19) and Hungary (10.4).

In photos: America on edge amid fears of election violence

Boarded up windows in D.C. Photo: Liu Jie/Xinhua via Getty Images

America's cities are bracing for violence as soon as tomorrow.

Driving the news: Landmarks, stores, and restaurants in New York, Washington D.C. and other cities are boarding up their doors in fear that Election Day will bring another blow to their businesses, many of which are already reeling from the pandemic and damage from protests.