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The body of the late Rep. John Lewis was transported Sunday across the famous Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., where the civil rights icon first helped lead a march for voting rights in 1965.

Why it matters: The march, in which Lewis and other activists were beaten by police officers who attacked them with clubs, became known as "Bloody Sunday" and was a critical turning point in the civil rights movement. The event helped lead to the passage of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965.

  • At 11 a.m. ET on Sunday, networks broke in with special coverage to show Lewis traveling across the Edmund Pettus Bridge for the final time.
  • The bridge is named for a Confederate general and KKK leader. House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) is among those calling for the bridge to be named for Lewis, but some in Selma are opposed.

The big picture: Sunday's event is part of a six-day memorial ceremony honoring Lewis, who died on July 17 at age 80 after battling with pancreatic cancer.

This story will be updated with more coverage.

Go deeper

Iowa governor signs order restoring voting rights to some felons

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed Wednesday an executive order restoring voting rights to some Iowans with felony records, the Des Moines Register reports.

Why it matters: It had been the last state in the country to bar all felons from voting, unless they applied for a special exception from the governor's office.

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.

7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons