The body of the late Rep. John Lewis was transported Sunday across the famous Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., where the civil rights icon first helped lead a march for voting rights in 1965.

Why it matters: The march, in which Lewis and other activists were beaten by police officers who attacked them with clubs, became known as "Bloody Sunday" and was a critical turning point in the civil rights movement. The event helped lead to the passage of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965.

  • At 11 a.m. ET on Sunday, networks broke in with special coverage to show Lewis traveling across the Edmund Pettus Bridge for the final time.
  • The bridge is named for a Confederate general and KKK leader. House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) is among those calling for the bridge to be named for Lewis, but some in Selma are opposed.

The big picture: Sunday's event is part of a six-day memorial ceremony honoring Lewis, who died on July 17 at age 80 after battling with pancreatic cancer.

This story will be updated with more coverage.

Go deeper

Updated Jul 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Civil rights icon John Lewis honored with ceremonies across Alabama

A horse-drawn carriage carrying the body of the late Rep. John Lewis on July 26 crosses the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, where Lewis and other civil rights leaders were attacked by police officers while marching in support of voting rights. Photo: Lynsey Weatherspoon/Getty Images

The life of the late Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) is being celebrated in a series of memorials this weekend across Alabama, the state in which he was born.

The big picture: Six days of remembrance for the giant of the civil rights movement, who died on July 17 at age 80, began Saturday morning with a service celebrating "The Boy from Troy" at Trojan Arena, Troy University, per a schedule provided by his family.

48 senators call on McConnell to allow vote on bill restoring Voting Rights Act

Rep. John Lewis waits to enter the Senate chamber in December 2019. Photo: Tom Williams

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) introduced a bill with the support of 47 co-sponsors on Wednesday that would fully restore the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965 in the name of the late civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.).

Why it matters: The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act aims to counter the Supreme Court's controversial 2013 ruling in Shelby County v. Holder, which gutted voter protections that had required states with a history of racial discrimination to gain federal approval before changing voting laws.

Updated Jul 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

John Lewis lies in state in the Capitol Rotunda

The body of civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis arrived at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Monday to lie in state, following a series of memorials this weekend that included a final trip across Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

The big picture: Lewis is the first Black lawmaker to receive the honor. Because the Capitol is closed to the public due to the coronavirus, Lewis will lie in state for just a few hours after an invitation-only ceremony is held for lawmakers. A public viewing will be held on the Capitol steps.