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FBI Director Christopher Wray during an October news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Investigators found Iran was behind an online drive to incite lethal violence against FBI Director Chris Wray and other officials who refuted President Trump and his supporters' baseless election claims, the Washington Post first reported Tuesday.

Why it matters: The FBI's findings on the "Enemies of the People" site, which outlets report included officials' addresses and other personal details with photos of them featuring crosshairs, indicate Iran has tried to cause discord in the U.S. before and after the election.

Details: Other targets on the now-defunct site and associated social media posts include former election security official Chris Krebs, who was fired by Trump after debunking election misinformation, alongside false claims about the result, WashPost notes.

  • Also featured were two GOP governors who certified President-elect Joe Biden's win: Arizona's Doug Ducey and Georgia's Brian Kemp, per the Wall Street Journal.
  • Disinformation was also spread on the site against voting machine companies, with far-right social media users calling for a 20-year-old Dominion Voting Systems worker's "imprisonment, torture or execution," with one post featuring an "animated image of a hanging noose," WashPost reports.

Of note: Another Dominion worker is suing the Trump campaign and others for for spreading false conspiracy theories, while Kemp said last week that pro-Trump conspiracy theorists had threatened his family.

What they're saying: WashPost obtained a statement from the FBI sent to officials featured on the site saying it had "highly credible information indicating Iranian advanced persistent threat actors were almost certainly responsible for the creation" of the site "containing death threats aimed at U.S. election officials in mid-December 2020."

  • The FBI did not immediately respond to Axios' request for comment.

For the record: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe said in October that Iran had sent threatening emails to Democratic voters in the U.S. and spreading videos claiming people could vote more than once.

  • Iran at the time denied it was trying to interfere in the U.S. presidential election.

Go deeper

Jan 20, 2021 - World

Iran lays out "road map" for nuclear talks with Biden

Khamenei earlier this month. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty

Iran has been accumulating bargaining chips and laying out its strategy for engagement with Joe Biden, who arrives in office promising to return the U.S. to the 2015 nuclear deal if Iran returns to compliance.

Why it matters: Recent statements from Iran's leaders indicate that they're willing to strike such a deal. But the sides differ over who will have to make the first move, and when.

Off the Rails

Episode 3: Descent into madness ... Trump: "Sometimes you need a little crazy"

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 3: The conspiracy goes too far. Trump's outside lawyers plot to seize voting machines and spin theories about communists, spies and computer software.

President Trump was sitting in the Oval Office one day in late November when a call came in from lawyer Sidney Powell. "Ugh, Sidney," he told the staff in the room before he picked up. "She's getting a little crazy, isn't she? She's really gotta tone it down. No one believes this stuff. It's just too much."

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.