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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Georgia election officials and Gov. Brian Kemp (R) certified the state's election results on Friday, AP reports.

Why it matters: President-elect Biden now officially wins the state by a little more than 12,600 votes, though the Trump campaign has until Tuesday to request a recount since the margin is within 0.5%.

The state of play: A recount would be completed using scanning machines and would be paid for by the counties, per AP.

  • Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger earlier on Friday issued a correction to a prior announcement that the state's election results had been certified.

What they're saying: “State law now requires the governor’s office to formalize the certification, which paves the way for the Trump campaign to pursue other legal options and a separate legal option if they choose," Kemp said during a press conference Friday.

  • "Working as an engineer throughout my life, I live by the motto that numbers don’t lie," Raffensperger said during a news conference at the state Capitol, NPR reports.
  • "As secretary of state, I believe that the numbers that we have presented today are correct. The numbers reflect the verdict of the people, not a decision by the secretary of state's office or of courts or of either campaign."

The big picture: The certification comes as President Trump and his campaign are seeking to discredit election tallies in key swing states that flipped to Biden this cycle as the president has engaged in baseless and unproven claims of widespread voter fraud that affected their results.

  • Secretaries of state and election officials across the U.S. have reported no instances of widespread voter fraud, whether through in-person or mail-in voting.

This breaking news item has been updated after the Georgia secretary of state certified the state's election results.

Go deeper

24 hours ago - Podcasts

The test of the electoral system

Two weeks ago, the Wayne County Board of Canvassers in Michigan met to certify the presidential election results and both Republican members refused. The two Democratic canvassers voted to approve the results. That meant it was a tie. A few hours later, the Republicans relented — there was another vote, and the certification happened.

It wasn’t just these Republicans in Michigan. A Republican Secretary of State in Georgia, a Republican county supervisor in Arizona and Republican-appointed judges in Pennsylvania were among the state and local officials who ended up validating Joe Biden’s presidential win over Donald Trump in the presidential election.

Did it all come down to these few people?

  • Plus, President Trump wants to auction drilling rights in Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife Refuge.
  • And, a new genealogy database dedicated to enslaved people and their stories.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
8 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18. Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, giving undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children a chance to petition for protection from deportation.

Why it matters: DACA was implemented under former President Obama, but President Trump has sought to undo the program since taking office. Friday’s ruling will require Department of Homeland Security officers to begin accepting applications starting Monday and guarantee that work permits are valid for two years.