A mural painted by Brazilian street artist Eduardo Kobra in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

For the first time, the number of Americans who want higher immigration levels has surpassed those who want them lowered, according to Gallup, which has tracked responses to the question since 1965.

The big picture: The Trump administration has temporarily cut off several major paths of immigration using coronavirus emergency powers. But the new survey, which went out before the Supreme Court DACA decision and new visa restrictions, found a record 34% of Americans actually want more immigration.

  • The percentage of Americans wanting less immigration has fallen to a new low of 28%, while a slim plurality of Americans want immigration levels maintained as is.

Between the lines: The survey results reveal the growing, significant political disparities over the issue of immigration.

  • Support for increased immigration has sharply risen among Democrats and independents over the last couple of years, but has slightly fallen among Republicans, according to Gallup.
  • Half of Democrats would prefer increased immigration, compared to just 13% of Republicans.

Go deeper

73% see bias in news reporting as "a major problem"

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo. Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images

73% of Americans see bias in news reporting as "a major problem," according to a study out Tuesday from the Knight Foundation and Gallup.

Why it matters: That's up from 65% in 2017, indicating "the gap between what Americans expect from the news — and what they think they are getting — is growing," the Knight Foundation writes.

Why you should be skeptical of Russia's coronavirus vaccine claims

Photo: Alexey Druzhini/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin announced Tuesday that his country has registered a coronavirus vaccine and said that one of his daughters has already been inoculated, AP reports.

Why it matters: Scientists around the world are skeptical about Russia's claims. There is no published scientific data to back up Putin's claims that Russia has a viable vaccine — or that it produces any sort of immunity without significant side effects.

A quandary for state unemployment agencies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

State agencies charged with paying unemployment benefits to jobless residents have their backs against the wall as they rush to parse President Trump's executive actions on coronavirus aid.

Why it matters: States are being asked to pitch in $100 per unemployed resident, but it’s a heavy lift for cash-strapped states that are still unclear about the details and may not opt-in at all. It leaves the states and jobless residents in a state of limbo.