Updated Aug 28, 2019

Trump repeats false disaster relief claim as Puerto Rico faces storm Dorian

The Emergency Operation Centre (COE) monitors Tropical Storm Dorian in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, on August 27, 2019. Photo: Erika Santelices/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump falsely claimed again on Tuesday that Congress has sent $92 billion in disaster relief aid to Puerto Rico, instead of the $42.7 billion that it has actually sent.

Why it matters: Puerto Rico has declared a state of emergency as Tropical Storm Dorian heads toward the U.S. territory. The island is still reeling from Hurricane Maria, which struck in 2017 — the year it effectively became bankrupt amid "the biggest government financial collapse" in American history.

Reality check: The Trump administration plans to increase restrictions on the island's federal aid after the political fallout of former Gov. Ricardo Rosselló's replacement being ousted. That aid was meant to help rebuild Puerto Rico recover from Maria.

  • The Washington Post reports that about $14 billion of funds allocated by Congress has reached Puerto Rico so far.

What they're saying: San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, a well-known Trump critic responded to Trump's tweet on CNN, saying: "It's close to between $12.6 and $14 billion that have come to Puerto Rico and still, things have not worked appropriately."

The big picture: Trump approved an emergency disaster declaration for Puerto Rico Tuesday night, as Dorian neared the island.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Cruz's comments and Trump's emergency declaration announcement.

Go deeper: Puerto Rico Gov. Rosselló's scandals threaten recovery from Hurricane Maria

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Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

5 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.