President Trump's director of social media and deputy chief of staff for communications Dan Scavino tweeted Friday that "Twitter is full of s--t" after the platform determined that one of the president's tweets in response to civil unrest in Minneapolis violated the company's rules.

Why it matters: Scavino is the "caretaker of Trump's explosive Twitter feed," as Politico reported last year, and the president relies on him for advice on how some of the administration's most controversial moves will be received on social media.

  • Trump's late-night tweet threatened shooting in response to the Minneapolis protests and was subsequently limited in its reach by the platform.
  • Twitter found that it "violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence," the company said in text that now accompanies it. "However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public's interest for the Tweet to remain accessible."
  • The decision to label Trump's tweet was made by teams within Twitter and CEO Jack Dorsey was informed of the plan before the tweet was labeled, Twitter told Axios' Ina Fried.

What he said:

"Twitter is targeting the President of the United States 24/7, while turning their heads to protest organizers who are planning, plotting, and communicating their next moves daily on this very platform. Twitter is full of s--t - more and more people are beginning to get it."
— Dan Scavino

The big picture: The battle is part of a larger war between the Trump administration and Twitter, which kicked off when the company issued its first fact-check against the president earlier this week.

  • Trump then signed an executive order Thursday with an aim of trying to limit legal protections afforded to social media sites, though the move was slammed by tech, business and civil rights groups.

Go deeper

Trump’s superpower turns to kryptonite

Screenshot from CNN

No president in our lifetime has enjoyed a more mesmerizing, seemingly unbendable hold on his political base than Donald Trump. He shifts their views on big topics like the FBI or Vladimir Putin and retains their support regardless of what he says or does.

Why it matters: This connection is turning fast into a liability for Trump and the entire GOP because the president and his mostly white, mostly male base are on the opposite side of most Americans on the epic topics of our day — wearing masks, combating the coronavirus, and condemning racial inequality and police brutality.

The bottom-up revolution hits Facebook

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Coca-Cola, Unilever and Hershey said Friday that they're cutting back on social-media-advertising, adding seismic voices to a growing boycott of Facebook.

Why it matters: This is a vivid example of a trend spotted last year by Axios CEO Jim VandeHei, and amplified by the new American realities brought on by the virus and protests: CEOs are the new politicians. They're helping do what President Trump and Congress would not.

10 mins ago - Health

Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases

People celebrate Independence Day by visiting the beach on July 4, 2020 in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Photo: Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Florida reported 15,299 confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday — a new single-day record for any state, according to its health department.

The big picture: The figure smashes both Florida's previous record of 11,458 new cases and the single-state record of 11,694 set by California last week, according to AP. It also surpasses New York's daily peak of 11,571 new cases in April, and comes just a day after Disney World reopened in Orlando.