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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Congress voted Thursday to raise the legal age to purchase tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21 as part of a $1.37 trillion spending measure.

The state of play: The larger funding bill helped to avoid a government shutdown. President Trump signaled he will likely sign it before federal funding runs out Friday at midnight.

The big picture: A national vaping epidemic has consumed the country, with thousands reporting injuries from a mysterious illness and more than 50 people dead as a result. There has been a push to increase the minimum age to smoke to 21 across numerous states, USA Today reports, with 19 states and the District of Columbia already bumping the age limit up.

  • The effort to raise the legal age to buy tobacco has largely been bipartisan, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) pushing the issue. The two introduced the Tobacco-Free Youth Act in May.

Worth noting: Trump has previously flipped his stance on vaping products. He intended to ban flavored e-cigarettes before changing his mind earlier this year.

Go deeper:

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The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.