Updated Dec 19, 2019

Senate passes $1.37 trillion spending deal

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/ Getty Images

The Senate on Thursday voted 81-11 to approve a $1.37 trillion spending measure to avoid a government shutdown when federal funding runs out at midnight on Friday, NPR reports.

What they're saying: Kellyanne Conway told reporters President Trump is “very happy” about the legislation and signaled that he plans to sign the two bills to avoid a shutdown, according to CNBC.

Details: The spending package allots $49 billion in funding across the government and includes policy provisions such as increasing the legal age of tobacco purchases to 21, a permanent repeal of three health insurance taxes and $1.5 billion in state grants to address to the opioid crisis.

  • $25 million will be carved out in funding for gun violence research — the first time Congress will have funded the issue in 20 years.
  • $1.375 billion for fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border.
  • $425 million in election security grants.
  • A $22 billion increase in defense spending.
  • The legislation also boosts domestic and military spending, including a 3.1% pay raise for military members and federal civilian employees.

What's next: The deal will head to Trump's desk for his signature.

The big picture: Unlike last year, Congress and the executive branch are on track to avoid an end-of-year shutdown.

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