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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Californians approved of a ballot proposition aimed at “fixing” loopholes in the California Consumer Privacy Act and beef up the enforcement resources available by setting up a new agency.

Why it matters: The CCPA, which took effect January 2019, has been closely watched by other states as a potential model for privacy legislation. But it’s also faced criticisms, including that it gives social media companies too many easy workarounds.

Details: Under the CCPA, companies that “share” user data with other services ( as opposed to “selling" it) and those who use customer data for a “business purpose” can ignore users' choice to opt out of letting companies use their data. "Business purpose" can include online ad targeting.

  • The new proposition ends that exemption and requires more companies, including those that sell targeted ads, like Facebook — to respect those opt-outs.
  • It will also beef up the enforcement resources available by setting up a new agency with $10 million in funds.

Yes, but: It's also been criticized, including by privacy advocates like the Consumer Federation of California, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the ACLU's California arm, for some of its fine print.

  • Specifically, critic say it further entrenches companies' ability to charge users who opt out of sharing their data, which might impact already disadvantaged users who can't afford that cost.
  • Critics also say the proposition should have broadened those who are eligible to sue companies beyond state officials to individual users.
  • Some wanted the proposition to require that companies treat all user data collection as an "opt-in" arrangement rather than a default that users can opt out of.

Moreover: Other state and city-level ballot measure are also likely to affect Silicon Valley.

  • San Franciscans voted in favor of Prop. L, which will tax companies that pay the highest-earning employee (often the chief executive) 100 times or more than the median salary of its San Francisco workers, starting in 2022.
  • They also voted in favor of Prop. F, which will phase out the city's payroll-based business taxes in favor of a tax on gross receipts. It will also increase registration fees and taxes for some larger companies, and decrease taxes on small businesses with less than $1 million in gross receipts. Large tech companies would likely see bigger tax bills.
  • Californians voted in favor of Prop. 22, which lets gig economy companies like Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash treat their drivers as independent contractors instead of reclassifying them to be employees, as a recently approved law required.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Lyft touts California ballot victory amid mixed Q3 results

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Lyft posted a much larger loss than analysts expected, though it beat revenue estimates, in its third quarter results reported Tuesday. But on a call with analysts, the company pointed to its recent legislative victory in California and the potential it sees in expanding its foray into delivery as signs of better times ahead.

Why it matters A week ago, Lyft and other gig companies got California voters to back a ballot proposal that cements their drivers' status as independent contractors, which is central to the companies' business models.

2 mins ago - Sports

The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Packed stadiums and a more normal fan experience could return by late 2021, NIAID director Anthony Fauci said yesterday.

Why it matters: If Fauci's prediction comes true, it could save countless programs from going extinct next year.

Trump's 2024 begins

Trump speaking to reporters in the White House on Thanksgiving. Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump is likely to announce he'll run again in 2024, perhaps before this term even ends, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has already set in motion two important strategies to stay relevant and freeze out other Republican rivals.