Stories by Alison Snyder

Where disruptive ideas come from

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Illustration: Caresse Haaser, Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Science is increasingly specialized, big and so information-saturated that experts can struggle to keep up in their own fields, fueling debate about whether the massive investments are being matched with novel findings and solutions.

What's new: Generating disruptive ideas, according to research published this week, can be encouraged in two seemingly contrasting ways — by forming small teams and leveraging crowds of workers. Each addresses a common enemy of innovation: how we interfere with each other's thinking and creativity.

A good news story from Davos

Illustration of syringes
Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

DAVOS, Switzerland — Joint global efforts are finding it harder to win general support at the moment, but a nearly 20-year campaign to vaccinate children around the world was described as a success story at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week.

The good news: Since its formation at the World Economic Forum in 2000, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance —a nonprofit that sells subsidized vaccines to the world's poorest countries — has helped to immunize some 700 million children against polio, cholera, measles and other diseases.

Growing up, and parenting, as a refugee

Illustraton of refugees
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The length of time people are living as refugees is now longer than ever. Day-to-day life for families in displacement — poverty, fear, insecurity and discrimination — can put the psychological and emotional development of the youngest refugees at risk.

The big picture: "There are structural problems in the system — policies around refugee residency, resettlement and employment — that directly affect the way parents can care for children and in turn their mental health," Amanda Sim of the Center for Evidence Based Interventions at the University of Oxford tells Axios.

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