Stories by Alison Snyder

Canadian AI summer school shows its global ambition

Students listen to a lecture at the Deep Learning and Reinforcement Learning summer school on July 25, 2018 at the Vector Institute in Toronto.
The Deep Learning and Reinforcement Learning Summer School in Toronto. Photo: CIFAR & Vector Institute

Amid an intense global race to develop artificial intelligence, Canada — home to some of the field's pioneers, and among the most aggressive nations in the contest — is running a boot camp for students this week to beef up its chances to share in the AI future.

What's going on: More than 250 students and researchers from 20 countries are in Toronto, where Canada is attempting to attract as much of the world's best AI talent it can by showcasing itself as a first-rate center for research.

Robots are stepping in to help solve the worker shortage

Reproduced from a National Bureau of Economic Reserach chart; Data extracted with WebPlotDigitizer; Chart: Axios Visuals

As the workforce ages in some countries and middle-aged workers are in short supply, industrial robots are stepping in to perform their jobs, according to a recent paper by economists Daron Acemoglu and Pascual Restrepo.

The big picture: Today, Asian countries have about eight workers for every person over the age of 65, and Europe and North America have 4 or fewer, according to the UN. But by 2050, seven Asian countries, 24 European and four Latin American will have a ratio of less than 2 workers per retiree, the UN projects. Experts say the U.S. social security system is stable at a ratio of 3 workers per retiree. When it falls to 2 to 1 it becomes unsustainable.

Scientists trace neutrino to source outside our galaxy

IceCube lab in Antarctica under the stars.
IceCube lab. Photo: Martin Wolf/IceCube/NSF

In a find that advances our understanding of fundamental particles in the universe, scientists announced Thursday they've detected a high-energy neutrino from outside our galaxy and, for the first-time, pinpointed its source.

Why it matters: The evidence, detailed in two new studies in the journal Science, further demonstrate the potential for multi-messenger astronomy — that is, astronomy that looks at the whole electromagnetic spectrum — to help scientists answer longstanding mysteries about high-energy physics.