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Esther Vargas / Flickr cc

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey doesn't buy critics' arguments that his company gives President Trump a huge platform to blast out often-controversial tweets, he said on NBC News' "Sunday Today with Willie Geist" that will air Sunday.

I believe it's really important to hear directly from our leadership. And I believe it's really important to hold them accountable. And I believe it's really important to have these conversations out in the open, rather than have them behind closed doors. So if we're all to suddenly take these platforms away, where does it go? What happens? It goes in the dark. And I just don't think that's good for anyone.

Censorship claims: Meanwhile, Mashable reports that Donald Trump, Jr. accused Twitter of censorship after one of his tweets was not visible to some. "I don't think there is anything remotely controversial or offensive about the truth here and yet it seems @twitter decided to at least partially censor the tweet," Trump Jr. wrote in his Instagram caption about a tweet about an Obamacare news story. As Mashable explained, Twitter users can flag potentially inappropriate tweets and Twitter staff will review the content and decide if it requires a warning message — which appears to be the process playing out in this case.

Go deeper

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.

Mike Pence calls Kamala Harris to offer congratulations and help

Mike Pence. Photo: Chip Somodevilla via Getty

Vice President Mike Pence called Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Thursday to congratulate her and offer assistance in the transition, the New York Times first reported.

Why it matters: The belated conversation came six days before the inauguration after a contentious post-election stretch. President Trump has neither spoken with President-elect Joe Biden, nor explicitly conceded the 2020 election.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

The coronavirus variants: What you need to know

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New variants of the coronavirus circulating globally appear to increase transmission and are being closely monitored by scientists.

Driving the news: The highly contagious variant B.1.1.7 originally detected in the U.K. could become the dominant strain in the U.S. by March if no measures are taken to control the spread of the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.