Alex Brandon / AP

President Trump, in a bit of sly counter-programming, yesterday announced a massive rally in Harrisburg, Pa., at 7:30 p.m. next weekend — smack in the middle of the White House Correspondents' Association dinner that he and his staff are boycotting.

Saturday is also Trump's 100-day mark. And although he dismissed it on Twitter as "the ridiculous standard of the first 100 days," the White House says it's "launching a web page dedicated to the first 100 days," and "will also be producing graphics, videos, and other digital content for the President's massive online following to share."

Sneak peek: Trump's staff has also planned a packed week designed to compete with all the media nattering. Depending on your perspective, it either looks like a victory lap or cramming for exams:

  • "On Monday, the President will speak with NASA astronaut Dr. Peggy Whitson about the importance of empowering women to pursue educations and careers in STEM fields as she sets the record for the most time spent in space of any American."
  • "On Tuesday, he will give remarks at the National Holocaust Memorial Museum's National Day of Remembrance. Later that day, he will host a roundtable discussion with farmers and sign an Executive Order to protect and provide relief for rural America."
  • "On Wednesday, the President will be outlining principles for tax reform. ... The Department of Homeland Security will roll out the Victims of Immigrant Crime Engagement (VOICE) Office."
  • "On Thursday, the President of Argentina will come to the White House ... [Trump] will also be signing an Executive Order with respect to Veterans ... That evening, the President will have dinner with the Justices of the Supreme Court, including his successfully confirmed nominee Justice Neil Gorsuch."
  • "On Friday, the President will ... [sign] several Executive Orders on energy. ... He will also give remarks at the National Rifle Association's Leadership Forum in Atlanta."
  • "Throughout the week the President, Cabinet officials, and senior White House staff will be accessible to media from the national level to the local and everything in between."

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 19,680,042 — Total deaths: 727,777 — Total recoveries — 11,962,565Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 5,002,523 — Total deaths: 162,455 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Nancy Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on employment — Trump adviser Larry Kudlow says he regrets suggesting the benefits could only be extended by Congress.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — Poll: 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.