Electronic health records

What your hospital knows about you

Illustration of a neon sign in the shape of a health plus with an information "i" in the center.
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Every trip to a doctor's office or hospital adds more information to a deep, comprehensive record of who you are — physically, emotionally and even financially.

Why it matters: Health care data breaches are more common than ever, putting our most sensitive personal information at risk of exposure and misuse.

Where electronic health records went wrong

Nurses use the IT system at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Brookline, Mass. Photo: Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Electronic health records were supposed to revolutionize the U.S. health care system, saving money and improving quality in one fell swoop. The actual results are much less satisfying. And so Kaiser Health News took a very deep dive into what went wrong.

The big picture: Doctors hate most of these systems. That's what a lot of this comes down to. The theoretical benefits of EHRs are/were real, but KHN offers many examples of how difficult they are to use in practice.