Electronic health records

Medtech's quick-fix addiction

Illustration of Caduceus with two snakes fighting.
Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Some technologists look at the pileup of crises weighing down American health care — overworked doctors, overpriced treatments, wacky health record systems — and see an opportunity to overhaul the industry, which could save lives and make them money.

Yes, but: There's frequently a chasm between can-do engineers itching to rethink health care and the deliberate doctors and nurses leery of tech that can make their lives more complicated, or worse, harm their patients.

A major hospital system is building its own electronic health record

Exterior photo of Long Island Jewish Medical Center hospital with trees and grass in foreground.
Northwell Health's teaching hospital in New Hyde Park, New York. Photo: Northwell Health

Northwell Health, one of the biggest not-for-profit hospital systems in the country, is planning to develop its own system for electronic medical records, with the ultimate goal of selling the technology to other hospitals and clinics.

Why it matters: Physicians, nurses and others generally dislike most of the existing electronic health record systems. But this is an unusually proactive effort from a hospital system to actually solve those problems.