Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The software industry directly accounts for 2.9 million jobs in the U.S., a 14.6% increase since 2014, according to a report out today by Software.org, the research arm of the software industry's trade group BSA. The average annual salary for software developers is $104,360, which is more than twice the annual average wage for all U.S. occupations, according to the report.

Why this matters: The software industry is growing as new technologies like artificial technology, self-driving cars, augmented reality and the internet of things — all of which rely heavily on software — continue to advance. Software-related jobs continue to be among the more lucrative jobs requiring STEM skills, a shortage of which puts such workers in high demand.

Just yesterday the Trump administration announced an initiative to expand students' access to computer science and STEM education. Increased training in these areas, particularly in the K-12 setting, is one way experts think students can be better prepared for the modern economy that is increasingly leaving many communities behind.

Go deeper: Silicon Valley no longer has a lock on software developer jobs.

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Updated 43 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 32,881,747 — Total deaths: 994,821 — Total recoveries: 22,758,171Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 7,079,909 — Total deaths: 204,503 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Durbin on Barrett confirmation: "We can’t stop the outcome"

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that Senate Democrats can “slow” the process of confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most," but that they "can’t stop the outcome."

Why it matters: Durbin confirmed that Democrats have "no procedural silver bullet" to stop Senate Republicans from confirming Barrett before the election, especially with only two GOP senators — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — voicing their opposition. Instead, Democrats will likely look to retaliate after the election if they win control of the Senate and White House.

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge announced in an op-ed Sunday that he would be voting for Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Ridge, who was also the first secretary of homeland security under George W. Bush, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.