Sep 12, 2017

Many Americans can't name any First Amendment rights

Data: The Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey, August 9-13, 2017, 1,013 respondents; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

"More than half of Americans (53%) incorrectly think it is accurate to say that immigrants who are here illegally do not have any rights under the U.S. Constitution," according to the Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey, by the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

37% of the 1,013 adults surveyed (37%) can't name any of the rights guaranteed under the First Amendment. Why it matters, from Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the center's director: "Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution presupposes that we know what they are."

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Amash: Trump's abuse of power reflects "precisely" what the framers envisioned

Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.) said in a speech during the impeachment debate Wednesday that President Trump's alleged abuse of power to solicit foreign interference in a U.S. election is "precisely the type of conduct the framers of the Constitution intended to remedy through the power of impeachment."

Why it matters: Amash is one of the most conservative members of the House. He left the Republican Party earlier this year over his opposition to the GOP's refusal to support an impeachment inquiry into Trump's dealings with Ukraine.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Exclusive poll: Black Americans motivated by Trump to vote in 2020

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A majority of black Americans are more interested in voting in the 2020 presidential election than they were in 2016, according to a national survey of 1200 black voters and non-voters conducted by Third Way and the Joint Center.

Why it matters: Black voter turnout declined significantly in 2016 nationally and in key swing states, ultimately contributing to Hillary Clinton's loss to Donald Trump. New details from focus groups and polling suggests that the motivation to remove Trump from office is firing up black Americans to head to the polls next November.

Go deeperArrowDec 30, 2019

2024 lookahead poll: Democrats see diverse future

Data: Online SurveyMonkey poll (margin of error: ±2.5 percentage points). Chart: Axios Visuals

In a SurveyMonkey poll for Axios taking a very early look at a theoretical 2024 field, Pete Buttigieg tops a list of Democrats, with a slight advantage over Kamala Harris.

Why it matters: A poll this early can only tell you so much. But what's striking is that none of the top seven Democratic candidates are heterosexual white men — an indicator of growing diversity in the party.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 5, 2020