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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A new survey finds that 68% of Americans believe Big Tech companies have too much power in the economy, and 56% think these firms should be regulated more than they are now.

Why it matters: The Pew Research Center survey, conducted April 12-18, 2021, shows a statistically significant increase for those who support more regulation — a big uptick from 47% in June 2020.

  • The only political group that did not show a significant increase in those calling for more regulation is moderate or liberal Republicans, Pew found.
  • Conservative Republicans (80%) are the political group most likely to say Big Tech companies have too much economic influence, followed by liberal Democrats (74%).

The intrigue: Americans are split on whether the government should cap these companies' growth so that they can't undermine competition.

  • Even if major tech companies follow the rules, 55% say the government should not let them grow beyond a certain size. Liberal Democrats are most likely to support this.
  • 42% think that, as long as companies follow the rules, they should be allowed to grow unchecked by government intervention.

Of note: Americans who are more familiar with the debates over regulating tech companies are more likely to think that the firms should be more regulated and are also more likely to say their growth should be limited.

Go deeper: Read Pew's analysis

Go deeper

Jul 20, 2021 - Technology

Ad tech bounces back

Expand chart
Data: LUMA Partners; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

There's been an explosion in advertising and marketing tech deals this year, according to new data, a sign of life for a sector that not long ago was looking ready to crumble with the deprecation of third-party tracking cookies.

Why it matters: A collision of recent events — including the surge in e-commerce, gaming and streaming during the pandemic, a massive recovery in advertising, and the race to replace cookies — has made ad and marketing tech firms more palatable to public shareholders and more intriguing to private investors.

Jul 20, 2021 - Technology

Conservative media diets tied to distrust in health officials

Expand chart
Reproduced from Annenberg Public Policy Center; Chart: Axios visuals

People who rely on conservative media have much less confidence in key public health institutions and experts, and are much more likely to believe misinformation about the vaccine, according to a new study from the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Why it matters: The survey finds a widening gap between Americans who trust key health institutions and those who don't.

Biden names tech foe as DOJ antitrust chief

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Jonathan Kanter, an antitrust veteran who is a favorite of progressives, is the Biden administration's choice to lead the Department of Justice's antitrust section as it pursues a raft of cases against tech giants, the White House announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: The nomination completes a trifecta of wins for Democrats who want to see the standards for holding tech companies accountable for monopolistic behavior broaden beyond the traditional "consumer harm" measure.