Mar 5, 2018

How Christopher Steele compiled the dossier

Steele in London. Photo: Getty Images

"Christopher Steele, the Man Behind the Trump Dossier: How the ex-spy tried to warn the world about Trump’s ties to Russia," writes Jane Mayer in The New Yorker.

Key quote: "It’s too early to make a final judgment about how much of Steele’s dossier will be proved wrong, but a number of Steele’s major claims have been backed up by subsequent disclosures."

  • "Trump’s defenders argued that Steele was not a whistle-blower but a villain— a dishonest Clinton apparatchik who had collaborated with American intelligence and law-enforcement officials to fabricate false charges against Trump and his associates."
  • "Steele exclaimed one day to friends: 'They’re trying to take down the whole intelligence community! ... And they’re using me as the battering ram to do it.'"
  • "In London, Steele is back at work, attending to other cases. Orbis [his firm] has landed several new clients as a result of the publicity surrounding the dossier. The week after it became public, the company received two thousand job applications."

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