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Members of the U.S. National Guard arrive at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 12. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Google informed its advertising partners Wednesday that beginning Jan. 14, its platforms will block all political ads, as well as any related to the Capitol insurrection, "following the unprecedented events of the past week and ahead of the upcoming presidential inauguration," according to an email obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: Political ad bans are designed to curb confusion and misinformation surrounding highly sensitive events. Google says a limited version of its "sensitive event" policies went into effect after the violent events in the Capitol on Jan. 6.

  • Google lifted a ban on election ads in December after the Nov. 3 election and ahead of the Georgia runoffs.

Details: Advertisers will not be able to run any political ads or ads "referencing candidates, the election, its outcome, the upcoming presidential inauguration, the ongoing presidential impeachment process, violence at the U.S. Capitol, or future planned protests on these topics," according to the email.

  • "There will not be any carveouts in this policy for news or merchandise advertisers," the notice reads.
  • The ban will apply broadly to any ads running through Google's ad tech platforms, including Google Ads, DV360, YouTube, and AdX Authorized Buyer.
  • Google says it will also be "extremely vigilant" about enforcing its longstanding Dangerous and Derogatory Content policy, which prohibits any ads that promote hate or incite violence.

The big picture: Google's announcement is in line with a broader strategy that the tech giant has been using for years to prevent confusion around sensitive events.

  • For example, in March and early April, it implemented a temporary ban on advertising with COVID-19-related terms to stop confusion from spreading around fake goods or price-gouging related to the pandemic.
  • Facebook's ad ban is still in place following the election.

What's next: Google says it will "carefully examine a number of factors before deciding to lift this policy for advertisers," but that the current plan is to keep this policy in place until at least Jan. 21, after inauguration.

Flashback:

Go deeper

Biden will reverse Trump's travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries

People protest former President Trump's Muslim travel ban outside the Supreme Court on June 26, 2018. Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty

President-elect Biden will reverse President Trump's controversial policy restricting travel for nationals from several Muslim-majority countries.

Why it matters: The ban restricted travel and immigration, to varying degrees, for about 7% of the world's population. Biden previously blamed Trump for the "unconscionable rise in Islamophobia."

20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.

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