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Photo: SOPA Images / Getty Images

Facebook and Google are extending their bans on political ads to prevent confusion about the election, the Financial Times reported Wednesday.

Why it matters: While tech companies are trying to limit post-election misinformation, hundreds of millions of dollars are about to pour into Georgia, now that control of the Senate — and the fate of the next president's agenda — hinges on runoffs for now one, but both of the state's seats, set for Jan. 5.

The state of play: The platforms originally said the bans would go a week after Election Day, but may continue thereafter. The bans were instituted to prevent messaging that could be misleading or misinform the public about election outcomes, Axios' Sara Fischer reports.

  • President Trump has taken to social media to amplify baseless claims of voter fraud, and his supporters have followed. Facebook has already shut down a number of fast-growing “Stop the Steal” groups, many of which organized around armed protests of alleged voter fraud.
  • Though the ban is intended to limit misinformation, it will create difficulties for Democrats and Republicans as they gear up for Senate runoffs in early January. Political advertising is one major avenue of outreach.
  • Neither Google nor Facebook commented on how their extended ad bans might affect the Georgia runoff.

Facebook’s ban is expected to continue for another month. It's unclear when Google's ban will lift.

What they’re saying: President-elect Joe Biden has said Facebook is not doing enough to strike down the “Stop the Steal" narrative.

  • Biden aide Bill Russo tweeted on Monday that the company is “shredding the fabric of our democracy.”

Go deeper

Updated Nov 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump campaign asks Georgia for another election recount

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Georgia will conduct another presidential election results recount following a Trump campaign request on Saturday.

Why it matters: State election officials and Gov. Brian Kemp (R) on Friday certified Georgia's election results that show President-elect Joe Biden officially won the state by just over 12,600 votes.

Murkowski: "It is time to begin the full and formal transition process"

Murkowski leaves the Senate Republicans lunch in September. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) tweeted Sunday, "It is time to begin the full and formal transition process." She called Trump's attempts to overturn President-elect Biden's win "inconsistent with our democratic process."

Why it matters: Only a handful of congressional Republicans have acknowledged Biden as president-elect as Trump and his campaign continue unsuccessful legal challenges in key swing states.

Updated 11 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The top Republicans who have acknowledged Biden as president-elect

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Some elected Republicans are breaking ranks with President Trump to acknowledge that President-elect Biden won the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: The relative sparsity of acknowledgements highlights Trump's lasting power in the GOP, as his campaign moves to file multiple lawsuits alleging voter fraud in key swing states — despite the fact that there have been no credible allegations of any widespread fraud anywhere in the U.S.