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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Elon Musk has reached a settlement with federal regulators, which had sued him on Thursday for making misleading material statements. He will get to remain as Tesla's CEO, but must step down as chairman.

The bottom line: This is a smart decision for both Musk and Tesla, as a drawn-out court case would have clouded both of their futures for months to come.

The background: Musk got into hot water for tweets related to his efforts to take Tesla private, particularly claiming that he had "funding secured" at $420 per share, even though the SEC claims he never discussed that specific price with prospective investors.

  • Musk reportedly had been ready to settle with the SEC last week, but then backed out of the deal because he felt the charges were unjustified.
  • The SEC responded with a lawsuit, which could have resulted in him being barred from serving as an officer or director of any public company for years.

Tesla has been struggling to show it can sustainably continue expanding production of the Model 3 sedan that’s critical to the company’s future.

Settlement details: Musk gets to remain as CEO, but within 45 days must step down as chairman for a period of three years. He also must pay a $20 million penalty, and comply with new company procedures for any future communications related to Tesla, including via his Twitter account.

  • Musk neither admits nor denies the allegations brought forth by the SEC.

Tesla, which was not a defendant in Tuesday's lawsuit, also will be required to pay a $20 million penalty, and add two new independent directors. Those details are included in a separate settlement from the one posted below, which is only with Musk.

Thought bubble: Kelly Blue Book executive analyst Rebecca Lindland writes, "A new chairman will also provide much needed guidance and the new board members governance to Tesla as a company and allow Elon to continue with his vision of changing the face of mobility."

  • Elon can’t just replace himself with a chairman of his choosing — the company has to appoint an independent chairman. Tesla has to hire a Securities Counsel whose job it will be to vet all Elon tweets before they go out.

Go deeper: Elon Musk throws a Tesla tantrum

Go deeper

North Carolina Sheriff's deputy fatally shoots Black man

A Black man was fatally shot by a North Carolina sheriff's deputy in Elizabeth City, northeast of Raleigh, on Wednesday, igniting protests in the local community.

Details: Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten said at a news briefing the State Bureau of Investigation was investigating the shooting of Andrew Brown Jr., which happened about 8:30 a.m as deputies were serving a search warrant.

Pew: Over 80% of Asian adults say violence against them is increasing

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

More than 80% of Asian adults say that violence against them is increasing, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

The big picture: The survey, conducted April 5-11, comes after the recent shootings in Atlanta in which eight people, including six Asian women were killed, as well as a yearlong spike in hate incidents against the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community.

China's government tied to new hack attacks targeting U.S. government

A member of the hacking group Red Hacker Alliance monitoring global cyberattacks on his computer at their office in Dongguan, China's southern Guangdong province. Photo: Nicolas Sfouri/AFP via Getty Images

The Chinese Communist Party is believed to be responsible for newly found hack attacks on the U.S. government, businesses and American infrastructure, cybersecurity company Mandiant said Wednesday.

Why it matters: This is the third major cybersecurity breach to hit the U.S. in recent months — including two in March blamed on hackers linked to China's government: one targeting 30,000 U.S. victims, including small businesses and local governments, the other hitting Microsoft.

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