Updated 14 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

President Trump held a press conference on Friday to blame China for the spread of the novel coronavirus, accusing the country of "instigating a global pandemic," and saying the U.S. would terminate its relationship with the World Health Organization.

By the numbers: More than 102,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus, according to data from Johns Hopkins — a milestone that puts the death toll far beyond some of the most tragic events in U.S. history.

  • Over 1.7 million people have tested positive for COVID-19 in the U.S. Nearly 400,000 Americans have recovered and over 15.6 million tests have been conducted.

What's happening: Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday that the economic blowback from the pandemic is hitting those who can least afford it the hardest.

  • Sens. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) asked Chief Justice John Roberts in a letter Friday to extend indefinitely the Supreme Court's live audio streams of oral arguments.
  • Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills soared in March, after they were put in the political spotlight by Trump, according to a new study in JAMA. Evidence suggests the drug is not an effective treatment for the virus and could be dangerous for some.
  • Vaccine: Now that there are glimmers of hope for a vaccine, governments, NGOs and others are hashing out plans for how vaccines could be distributed once they are available — and deciding who will get them first.
  • Nearly half of all African American, Latino, and low-income Americans are having trouble paying their bills, including medical bills.
  • Unemployment: About 40.7 million Americans have filed for unemployment since the pandemic began, including 2.1 million last week.
  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order Thursday giving power to private businesses to deny service to people without masks.
  • North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said Thursday that the state had one of its highest days of reported deaths and hospitalizations since the pandemic began.
  • California became the fourth state with at least 100,000 reported cases of the coronavirus on Wednesday, along with Illinois, New Jersey and New York.
  • The Texas Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that "a voter's lack of immunity to COVID-19" doesn't qualify them to apply for a mail-in ballot because it's "not a 'disability' as defined by the Election Code."
  • Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Wednesday the city will start to lift COVID-19 restrictions on May 29 after seeing a 14-day decline in community spread.
  • More than 62,300 health care workers have tested positive for the virus and at least 291 have died, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Tuesday. COVID-19 had infected about 9,300 health professionals when the CDC gave its last update on April 17.

The big picture: All 50 states have announced they are at least partially reopening their economies.

  • The CDC issued new guidelines on Wednesday detailing how office buildings can reopen following months of social distancing.
  • Testing: Most states aren't doing enough, especially those that have seen larger outbreaks, per recent testing targets calculated by the Harvard Global Health Institute.
  • Elections: States need to determine how to hold safe elections by this fall, when the virus will still be spreading. And state governments are facing budget shortfalls that threaten layoffs for public sector employees.

Go deeper... In photos: Life in the era of coronavirus across the U.S.

Editor's note: The graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14. This article has been updated with new details throughout. Check back for the latest.

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Updated 14 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

Over 500 schools in South Korea have either closed or postponed reopening, according to the Korea Times, which cites data from the Ministry of Education.

Why it matters: South Korea has been a model for how to handle the novel coronavirus, and the closures reportedly followed concerns from parents and teachers over child safety. The country's confirmed death toll has plateaued at 269 over the past few days, with few increases, per Johns Hopkins data.

How the U.S. might distribute a coronavirus vaccine

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Now that there are glimmers of hope for a coronavirus vaccine, governments, NGOs and others are hashing out plans for how vaccines could be distributed once they are available — and deciding who will get them first.

Why it matters: Potential game-changer vaccines will be sought after by everyone from global powers to local providers. After securing supplies, part of America's plan is to tap into its military know-how to distribute those COVID-19 vaccines.

23 hours ago - Health

Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March

Reproduced from Vaduganathan et al., 2020, "Prescription Fill Patterns for Commonly Used Drugs During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States"; Chart: Axios Visuals

Prescription fills of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine soared in March, after they were put in the political spotlight by President Trump, according to a new study in JAMA.

Why it matters: The evidence suggests that the drug is not an effective treatment for the coronavirus, and is even dangerous for some patients.