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Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden at Philadelphia City Hall in Pennsylvania in June. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden and the Democratic Party raised $141 million in June, his campaign announced on Wednesday night.

Why it matters: It's the most the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee has raised in a month. It's also more than the record $131 million President Trump's re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee raised last month.

Of note: The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee leads Trump in most polls. RealClearPolitics' polling average shows Biden ahead of the president by 9.4 points.

  • Trump's campaign has pulled in an impressive haul over the past two years —almost $950 million, with $295 million in the bank, per the New York Times.
  • Biden's campaign has not revealed its cash-on-hand total.

What they're saying: Biden campaign manager Jennifer O’Malley Dillon tweeted, "68% of our donors were new ... There’s real, grassroots energy for Joe."

  • Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted after announcing how much they raised in June, "Americans voting with their wallets, supporting the President."

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Updated Oct 8, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump says he won't take part in virtual debate

Photo: Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images

President Trump, who continues to battle a coronavirus infection, told Fox Business' Maria Bartiromo on Thursday that he will not take part in a virtual second presidential debate, with his campaign later saying he would do two in person debates later on this month.

What he's saying: "I'm not going to waste my time on a virtual debate. It’s not what debating is all about. ... It’s ridiculous," the president said.

Focus group: Michigan swing voters think Harris will act as president

Sen. Kamala Harris during Wednesday's vice presidential debate. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Several Michigan voters who are sticking with President Trump think that if Joe Biden gets elected, Sen. Kamala Harris will be running the show — and her Wednesday debate performance reinforced their view.

Why it matters: These are some of the few voters for whom the vice-presidential pick has outsized importance in how they view the two tickets, and for now that's benefitting Trump.

Biden: "You’ll know my position on court packing when the election is over"

Joe Biden again declined to say Thursday whether he would support expanding the Supreme Court if he wins the presidency and Democrats win the Senate, telling reporters that they'll find out when the election is over.

Why it matters: Some congressional Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), have suggested expanding the court if Senate Republicans confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during an election year — which they refused to do for former President Obama's nominee in 2016.