Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A judge ruled on Thursday that all three men charged in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man who was shot and killed in February Glynn County, Georgia, will stand trial, AP reports.

Why it matters: The video of Arbery's death was among several catalysts in the mass protests against racial injustice that have unfurled across the country and world over the past week and a half.

  • Gregory and Travis McMichael, two white men, were arrested on charges of murder and aggravated assault in May.
  • William Bryan Jr., who recorded the event, was also arrested in May on a felony murder charge and attempt to commit false imprisonment.

Details: The McMichaels pursued Arbery, who was out for his daily jog, after telling police they suspected that he had committed a burglary, according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.

  • An agent from the GBI testified at the probable cause hearing on Thursday that Bryan told police that Travis McMichael used a racial slur as he stood over Arbery's body after shooting him with a shotgun, according to AP.
  • The agent also testified that there is evidence that McMichael used racial slurs "numerous times" on social media and in text messages.

What they're saying:

"There's evidence of Mr. Bryan's racist attitude in his communications, and from that I extrapolate the reason why he made assumptions he did that day. He saw a man running down the road with a truck following him, and I believe he made certain assumptions that were, at least in part, based upon his racial bias."
— GBI Assistant Special Agent in Charge Richard Dial, according to CNN

The big picture: Protesters have demanded the prosecutors involved in investigating Arbery's death resign after long delays in the arrests of the men involved. The Justice Department is investigating whether the shooting qualifies as a hate crime.

Go deeper

Georgia passes bipartisan hate crimes bill

Protesters in Brunswick, Georgia on June 4 after a court appearance by Gregory and Travis McMichael, who were arrested on charges of murder and aggravated assault. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Georgia's legislature voted 127-38 on Tuesday to pass a bill requiring police officers to document when someone is subjected to a hate crime on the basis of race, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, religion or national origin.

The big picture, via the Wall Street Journal: Georgia has been weighing the passage of a hate crimes law for two decades.

Updated 47 mins ago - Science

Hurricane Isaias makes landfall in North Carolina

People walk through floodwaters on Ocean Blvd. in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, on Monday. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Hurricane Isaias made landfall as a Category 1 storm near Ocean Isle Beach in southern North Carolina at 11:10 p.m. ET Monday, packing maximum sustained winds of 85 mph, per the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

What's happening: Hurricane conditions were spreading onto the coast of eastern South Carolina and southeastern N.C., the NHC said in an 11 p.m. update. Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith told WECT News the eye of the storm triggered "a series of fires at homes" and "a lot of flooding." Fire authorities confirmed they were responding to "multiple structure fires in the area."

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 18,224,253 — Total deaths: 692,679 — Total recoveries — 10,865,548Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 4,713,500 — Total deaths: 155,401 — Total recoveries: 1,513,446 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  4. Sports: 13 members of St. Louis Cardinals test positive, prompting MLB to cancel Tigers series — Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.
  5. 1 🎥 thing: "Tenet" may be the first major film to get a global pandemic release.