Health care accounts for almost one-fifth of the American economy, making it the most expensive system in the world, by a wide margin.

Data: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Chart: Kerrie Vila/Axios

And the cost isn't going up because we're using more health care, but because of the prices we pay for those services.

What's next: There's agreement between the parties that the way we pay for health care — paying doctors and hospitals for each service they provide — is broken. The Affordable Care Act tried to advance a more integrated model and tie payments to the quality of care. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar shares those goals.

Be smart: One person's health care spending is another person's salary. For the system overall to spend less money, health care providers will have to make less money. And that's always a hard sell.

Go deeper

The pandemic is boosting the public's view of doctors

Reproduced from Kaiser Family Foundation; Chart: Axios Visuals

The coronavirus pandemic is leading Americans toward a more favorable view of doctors, according to our KFF polling.

Why it matters: New appreciation for frontline health care workers — expressed in polling as well as yard signs and nightly applause from apartment windows — could help boost morale within the medical profession and perhaps get young people more interested in specialties that aren’t usually the most lucrative.

Trump's new TikTok threat

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump said twice Monday that the U.S. Treasury would need to get a portion of the sale price of TikTok, as a condition of regulatory approval.

Why it matters: This is akin to extortion — the sort of thing you'd expect to hear on a wiretap, not from the White House in front of reporters.

Ford names James Farley as new CEO amid ongoing turnaround effort

James Hackett, left, is retiring as Ford CEO. Jim Farley, right, takes over Oct. 1. Photo: Ford

Ford announced Tuesday that James Farley will take over as its next CEO, replacing James Hackett, 65, who is retiring after three years in the job.

Why it matters: It leaves Farley to complete the company's ongoing turnaround effort. The transition will be that much harder as the industry tries to navigate the coronavirus-induced economic slowdown which shuttered Ford plants for two months on the eve of some of its most important vehicle launches.