Jun 6, 2019

Warren rebukes Biden's stance on an abortion amendment

Photo: Ray Chavez/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News/Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) positioned herself in opposition to Vice President Joe Biden, disagreeing with his abortion stance and support of the Hyde Amendment at an MSNBC Town Hall on Wednesday evening.

"Under the Hyde Amendment and every effort to try to chip away or push back or get rid of Rowe vs. wade, understand this: Women of means will still have access to abortions. Who won't ... will be poor women. It will be working women and women who can't afford to take off three days from work and very young women. It will be women who have been raped and women who have been molested by someone in their own family. We do not pass laws that take away that freedom from the women who are most vulnerable."
— Sen. Elizabeth Warren during an MSNBC town hall
  • When asked if Biden was wrong, in reference to his support of the ban on federal funding of abortion, Warren said: "Yes."

Context: At a time when Democrats are worried about abortion protection, Biden said on Wednesday that he wouldn't repeal the Hyde Amendment, which prevents the federal government from providing funding abortions except in extreme cases.

The big picture: While President Trump and Biden have been facing off, other 2020 Democratic candidates have been piggybacking off Biden's issues, trying to position themselves as a contender.

  • Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) said Biden's 1994 crime bill was "awful," and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) also disagreed with the bill.
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) took to Twitter to attack Biden's statements on climate change.

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Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

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Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.